News

Ernest Morrell Combines Faith, Love of Teaching in New Role at Notre Dame

Author: Theo Helm

Ernest Morrell’s passion to better serve at-risk youth and their families and help break the cycle of poverty led him to embark on a prolific academic career, where he has formed a generation of future teachers, scholars, and leaders dedicated to improving the lives of marginalized urban youth. Morrell joins Notre Dame’s faculty this summer, as he assumes the Coyle Professorship in Literacy Education, with appointments in the Department of English, the Department of Africana Studies, and the Institute for Educational Initiatives.

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Laura Dassow Walls commemorates 'American icon' Thoreau with new biography

Author: Carrie Gates and Brittany Collins Kaufman

As the 200th birthday of American icon Henry David Thoreau is celebrated around the world on July 12, Laura Dassow Walls, author of the comprehensive biography Henry David Thoreau: A Life, will be commemorating the date in Concord, Massachusetts, Thoreau’s birthplace. Walls, the William P. and Hazel B. White Professor of English, is a leading scholar of Thoreau. Thoreau: A Life, the first comprehensive biography of the life of Thoreau since Walter Harding’s The Days of Henry Thoreau was published in 1965, was officially released by the University of Chicago Press Wednesday.

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Ph.D. alumna receives 2017–2018 Mellon University Press Diversity Fellowship

Author: Notre Dame Press

English Ph.D. alumna Ana Jimenez-Moreno has been awarded the 2017–2018 Mellon University Press Diversity Fellowship at the University of Georgia Press. Jimenez-Moreno began her apprenticeship in scholarly publishing when she was awarded an inaugural 5+1 Postdoctoral Fellowship from the College of Arts and Letters, enabling her to work throughout the academic year with Stephen Wrinn, director of the University of Notre Dame Press.

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Renowned author Barry Lopez ’66 returns to Notre Dame, urging students to commit to social responsibility

Author: Carrie Gates

Barry Lopez believes we are on the verge of global upheaval — in the way democracies function, in the way economies work, in the way countries cope with unprecedented numbers of refugees and the effects of climate change. But he also believes that Notre Dame students are “unusually qualified to do something about it.” A renowned essayist, fiction writer, and former Department of American Studies faculty member, Lopez received his bachelor’s degree from Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters in 1966 and a master’s degree in 1968. He returned to his alma mater last month to give a lecture on sustainability — and to offer his encouragement to current students.

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In fiction and nonfiction, new professor tells war stories — and challenges war myths

Author: Josh Weinhold

Roy Scranton, who joined the Notre Dame faculty in fall 2016, doesn't write about war the way most Americans do. In his acclaimed debut novel War Porn and in his nonfiction writing in Rolling StoneThe New York Times, and the LA Review of Books, the Iraq War veteran pushes back against what he calls "the trauma hero" — the trope of making the American soldier the victim of American military aggresion. 

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English PhD student wins Notre Dame Shaheen 3MT competition

Author: Aaron Bell

Mimi Ensley, a Ph.D. student from the Department of English, won the 2017 Notre Dame Graduate School Shaheen Three Minute Thesis Competition (3MT) on Monday night in Jordan Auditorium. The Shaheen 3MT is a communication competition where graduate students from the Colleges of Engineering, Science and Arts and Letters try to effectively explain their research in a language appropriate to an audience of specialists and non-specialists alike, in three minutes or less. Competitors addressed a panel of judges in front of a live audience using one static slide as part of their presentation.

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Video: English alumna on turning a passion for language into a career abroad

Author: Todd Boruff

“Do what you feel naturally inclined to do, where your skills and abilities are taking you, what you're best at. It really has helped me to narrow down and find the right career,” said Elizabeth Simari ’08. An English and Italian major in the College of Arts and Letters, Simari studied abroad in Rome during her junior year. Her interest in the language, history, and culture of Italy developed into a passion, leading her to move to Sicily after graduation. After teaching English for a year and then earning a master's degree in literature, she wrote for L'Osservatore Romano, the Vatican’s English-language newspaper, and now teaches at the University of Loyola Chicago's campus in Rome.

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Associate Professor Kate Marshall awarded National Humanities Center fellowship

Author: Renee Peggs

Kate Marshall, associate professor of English at the University of Notre Dame, has received a fellowship from the National Humanities Center (NHC) to spend this academic year researching and writing at the center in Durham, North Carolina. The NHC grants up to 40 fellowships annually—from among hundreds of applications—to leading scholars from around the world in all fields of the humanities.

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English alumna and international journalist Sarah Childress ’03 tells the world’s stories

Author: Tom Lange

Sarah Childress ’03 didn’t come to Notre Dame planning to become an international journalist. As a freshman, she was unsure what career path she wanted to follow, but she knew she loved to write. Since majoring in English and minoring in the Gallivan Program in Journalism, Ethics, and Democracy, however, she's found her calling. Childress has covered Iraq for Newsweek, sub-Saharan Africa for the Wall Street Journal, been an editor for the GlobalPost, and written for The New York Times and The Washington Post. She’s now with PBS’s Frontline as a senior digital reporter. 

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English graduate student wins Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship

Author: Carrie Gates

César Soto wants to know how the spark of political revolution can transform religious concepts of community and inclusion. To better understand the issue, he’s turning to the literature of England, Ireland, and Mexico in the late 1700s and early 1800s. Soto, a Ph.D. candidate in Notre Dame’s Department of English, has been awarded a Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for 2016-17 to support his project.

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English professor wins ACLS fellowship to study medieval marginalia

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Kathryn Kerby-Fulton

Kathryn Kerby-Fulton studies medieval texts, many of them on sheepskins and fragile after hundreds of years in conditions not always suited for preservation. The Notre Dame Professor of English studies the margins of these medieval texts, which contain thoughts scrawled by some of the brightest minds of the time. They are a layer of interaction and understanding that Kerby-Fulton will spend the next year studying, supported by a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. 

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Notre Dame, Holy Cross lead transformational liberal arts education program at Indiana prison

Author: Josh Weinhold

WEI

Driven by a commitment to Catholic social teaching and a strong belief that a liberal arts education can transform lives, Notre Dame and Holy Cross College faculty are teaching college-level courses for inmates at Indiana’s Westville Correction Facility. Since 2013, nearly 100 inmates have earned college credit and 11 have earned associate degrees as of this month. But developing a strong foundation in reading, writing, research, public speaking, and critical thinking offers benefits that go far beyond the professional opportunities a degree might one day provide.

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Guggenheim Foundation awards fellowship to Professor Stephen Fallon

Author: Brian Wallheimer

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation has awarded a prestigious 2016 fellowship to Stephen Fallon, the Rev. John J. Cavanaugh, C.S.C., Professor of the Humanities in the Program of Liberal Studies and the Department of English. Fallon will use his fellowship to complete a comparative study of what happens when the poet and theologian John Milton and the scientist and theologian Isaac Newton—towering figures in 17th-century England—address some of the world’s biggest questions and come up with parallel answers.

 

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English Majors Explore International Summer Experiences

Author: Arts and Letters

Ois Globe Icon

Digitizing the Irish National Folklore Collection at University College Dublin. Honing Chinese language and cultural skills in Beijing.  Uncovering archaeological evidence of the Roman Empire’s influence in northern England. English majors in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters are spending their summers gaining valuable experience in other cultures around the world.

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English Honors Colloquium Brings Support, Collaboration to Senior Thesis Projects

Author: Carrie Gates

English Honors Colloquium

When Elizabeth Troyer began diving into her senior thesis research, she wasn’t alone. She was one of 17 seniors in Notre Dame’s Department of English honors concentration—all of whom participated in a colloquium as they embarked on their senior thesis projects. Students in the class discussed their thesis research in small groups, offered feedback, completed outlines and bibliographies, and shared presentations on their main ideas with the class. It’s just one example of how faculty members have worked to build a sense of community in the department and in the honors concentration.

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Why Majoring in English Made Patrick Lyons ’08 a Better Doctor

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Patrick Lyons Icon

Dr. Patrick Lyons ’08 doesn’t ask his patients if they have questions when he’s finished talking with them about a diagnosis. There’s a good chance they’ll say no. Instead, he asks what questions they have. Looking at how he practices medicine now, especially in his interactions with patients, Lyons realizes his time as an English major had a profound effect on how he communicates. “English prepared me well because I have the ability to think critically and organize and analyze the information in front of me,” he said. “Word choice and the way you’re addressing patients can be really powerful.”

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Professor Illuminates Impact of English Language By Focusing on How It’s Used

Author: Fred Bauters

Tim Machan

Tim Machan believes the English language is far more than the order of letters and words. It’s the highly personal, situational expressions we use to convey our ideas and feelings. It’s how we connect with or distance ourselves from everyone around us. We use it to define ourselves. Machan, a professor in Notre Dame’s Department of English, has spent 30 years researching and teaching English in its many forms and functions. His journey has pulled him further from grammatical conventions into how people around the world use English in their daily lives.

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