Upcoming Events By Month

« September 2016 »

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Early Modern Seminar: David Hall (Harvard Divinity School)

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Location: 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall

The Early Modern Area Seminar is please to announce a talk by Professor David D. Hall of Harvard Divinity School: “An Unfinished Reformation and its Critics: The Origins and Development of ‘Puritanism’ in Early Modern England.” 4:30 pm, Thursday, September 1, 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall.

Professor Hall has written extensively on religion and society, as well as the history of the book, in seventeenth-century New England and England. His books include The Faithful Shepherd: A History of the New England Ministry in the Seventeenth Century

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Friday, September 2, 2016

Annual Seamus Heaney Lecture: Declan Kiberd

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Location: Salon B, The William and Mary Ann Smith Ballroom, The Morris Inn

Declan Kiberd

The Institute's annual Seamus Heaney Lecture will be delivered by Declan Kiberd, the Donald and Marilyn Keough Professor of Irish Studies, Professor of English and Irish Language and Literature. His topic:“Modernism in the Streets: Joyce, Pearse and Stephens in 1916."

 

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Wednesday, September 7, 2016

SENS: Heather Hyde Minor

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Location: 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall

The next meeting of the Seminar in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-century Studies (SENS) will take place on Wednesday, September 7, at 5:00 pm in 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall. Heather Hyde Minor, Associate Professor of Art History, will speak on "Piranesi and the Art of History."  A reception will follow.

SENS provides a regular gathering point for the Notre Dame interdisciplinary community of faculty and graduate students engaged with this area of studies. Seminars include lectures, workshops, works-in-progress, and much conversation by Notre Dame faculty and graduate students.…

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Friday, September 9, 2016

American Area Seminar: Koritha Mitchell (Ohio State)

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Location: 312 DeBartolo Hall

Amsem Kmitchell

"A House is not a Home: New Negro Women & Homemaking Anxiety"

This lecture draws from the book-in-progress "From Slave Cabins to the White House: Homemaking Anxiety in African American Culture." Homemaking anxiety is the palpable tension that emerges when African Americans, especially women, continue to invest in traditional domesticity even while seeing the signs that it will not yield for them the respectability and safety it should. In the early 1900s, the community conversation on black success and citizenship centered on "race motherhood," the idea that women could best contribute to racial uplift by supporting men. Black women could not escape the influence of race motherhood, and questioning its expectations made them vulnerable to harsh criticism and possible ostracism. Nevertheless, black women's fiction of the 1920s and 1930s reveals the degree to which race motherhood was interrogated. Indeed, black women authors seem to suggest that the figure of the race mother emerged to rein them in, guiding them to make choices that advanced a male-centered agenda. Zora Neale Hurston's most famous novel Their Eyes Were Watching God

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Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Kelly Kerney, Courtney McDermott, Janet McNally & Lindsay Starck Reading

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Location: Hospitality Room, Reckers

Four alumnae ladies return to campus to read selections from their latest books. 

Kerney Authorphoto2

Kelly Kerney’s first novel, Born Again, was listed among the best debuts of the year by Kirkus Reviews, was a Book Sense Pick, and was recognized by the New York Public Library as one of the best books of 2006.  A Virginia Commission for the Arts fellowship recipient, she lives in Richmond, Virginia.…

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Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Roy Scranton Reading

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Location: Hospitality Room

Rscranton

Roy Scranton is the author of Learning to Die in the Anthropocene: Reflections on the End of a Civilization (City Lights, 2015), and co-editor of Fire and Forget: Short Stories from the Long War (Da Capo, 2013). His journalism, essays, criticism, and fiction have been published in The Nation, Rolling Stone, The New York Times, Contemporary Literature, The Appendix, LIT, Theory & Event

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Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Early Modern Seminar: Sarah Rivett

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Location: South Dining Hall Hospitality Room

The Early Modern Area Seminar is please to announce a talk by Sarah Rivett of Princeton University, "The 'Savage Sounds' of Christian Translations: How Missionaries Confronted the Limits of Universalism in Early America," Tuesday, September 27, at 3:30 pm. in the Hospitality Room of the South Dining Hall.…

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Wednesday, September 28, 2016

MFA 2nd Year Reading Fall 2016

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Location: Fischer Community Center

Zachary Anderson & Chris Muravez blow out the lights and activate the mind via text and visuals.

Zachary Anderson hails from Cheyenne, Wyoming. He received Bachelor of Arts degrees in English and French from the University of Wyoming. He stayed on at UW for a master’s degree in literature, writing a thesis on race and Beat Generation masculinities. Zack is interested in anxiety-ridden poetry that explores gender performance, neurosis, late capitalism, and popular culture.…

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