Upcoming Events By Year

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Thursday, February 6, 2014

Alex Beecroft Lecture

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Location: 210-214 McKenna Hall

alex_beecroft

Alexander Beecroft, Associate Professor in Classics and Comparative Literature University of South Carolina, will lecture on "Literary Ecology and Literary Form" at 5:00 pm on Thursday, February 6, in 210-214 McKenna. A reception will follow.

Alex Beecroft teaches courses in Greek and Latin language and literature, ancient civilizations, literary theory (ancient and modern) and the theory and practice of world literature. His major areas of research interest are in the literatures of Ancient Greece and Rome, pre-Tang Chinese literature, as well as current debates about world literature. His work has been published in journals ranging from the Transactions of the American Philological Association

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Friday, February 7, 2014

Robert Creeley Symposium

Location: Hesburgh Library Special Collections

The English Department is pleased to announce the Robert Creeley Symposium, Friday, February 7, 2014, organized by Stephen Fredman. The one-day symposium will accompany an exhibition, "Robert Creeley’s Library: The Poet’s Books as Art Museum and Network of Communications," in the Hesburgh Library's Special Collections and also the publication of The Selected Letters of Robert Creeley

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Thursday, February 27, 2014

Arthur Marotti Lecture

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Location: Medieval Institute Reading Room (715 Hesburgh Library)

arthur_marotti

“The Poetry Nobody Knows: Rare or Unique Verse in Early Modern English Manuscripts”

In various archives in Great Britain and the U.S. there are hundreds of manuscripts from the early modern period that contain poetic texts. Those associated with major and minor canonical authors have been accounted for, edited, and made part of literary history. Those that are anonymous or are by little known writers have largely been ignored. This lecture deals with a selection of (mostly anonymous) rare or unique poems found in surviving manuscript poetry collections of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in relation to the familial, collegial, and other coterie environments in which they were written. This includes verse composed by manuscript compilers, politically dangerous or obscene texts, and texts related to scandals and topical events of local interest. Among the examples chosen are a poem dealing with a case of mother-son incest and verse dealing with a cause célèbre in Oxford, the supposed providential revival of a hanged woman who was unjustly convicted of infanticide. Looking at the large body of rare or unique manuscript verse from the period, I argue that these neglected texts, which expand our sense of the writing practices in the period, not only need to be acknowledged in literary history, but also studied for what they reveal about the social life of early modern literary texts.…

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Terry Eagleton Public Lecture

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Location: Eck Visitors Center Auditorium

Terry Eagleton

The Department of English brings you the tenth public lecture by Terry Eagleton, Excellence in English Distinguished Visiting Professor. Eagleton's lecture, "The Death of God and the War on Terror" will be at 5:00 pm Wednesday, March 26, in the Eck Visitors Center Auditorium.…

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Margaret Atwood

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Location: McKenna Hall Auditorium

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The English Department is pleased to announce that our 2014 Yusko Ward-Phillips lecturer is Margaret Atwood. Ms. Atwood will speak at 7:00pm, Wednesday April 9, in the McKenna Hall Auditorium. A book signing and reception will follow in the McKenna Hall Atrium.…

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Thursday, May 1, 2014

Honors Thesis Abstract Reading

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Location: Coleman-Morse Student Lounge

Come celebrate the accomplishments of our English honors students at this annual event at which the students read abstracts of their honors theses, cheered on my their faculty supervisors, fellow students, and friends. The winner of the 2014 Tom Brennan Prize for Excellence in Writing will also be announced at this event Thursday, May 1, at 4:00 pm in the Coleman-Morse Student Lounge. A reception will follow.…

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Frese Festival - Panel Discussion

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Location: 715 Hesburgh Library

Dolores W

Please join us for a celebration of Professor Emerita Dolores Warwick Frese's contributions to the Department of English and to medieval studies at the University of Notre Dame. The festival will begin with the panel "Expressions of Medieval Religious Devotion":

Words of Welcome by Ann Astell (University of Notre Dame)…

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Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Imagining Medieval English (Day 3)

Location: McKenna Hall

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The English Department is pleased to announce the "Imagining Medieval English" conference, organized by Tim Machan, September 15-17, 2014. This three-day conference will bring together twelve distinguished scholars who are collaborating on a book entitled “Imagining Medieval English.” The participants will present papers that form the chapters of the book, and join in a general discussion of the topic. Most sessions will be open to the public.…

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Friday, September 19, 2014

John Protevi Lecture

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Location: 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall

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On Friday, September 19, at 2:00 pm in 119 O'Shaugnessey Hall, Dr. John Protevi will give a lecture titled "Rhythm, Affect, and the Greeks." John Protevi is the Phyllis M Taylor Professor of French Studies and Professor of Philosophy at Louisiana State University. The lecture is open to the public and based on material from his recent book Life, War, Earth: Deleuze and the Sciences

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Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Americanist Seminar: Christopher Looby

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Location: 119 DeBartolo

looby

The Americanists Reading Group is pleased to host a seminar on Tuesday, September 23, at 5:00 pm, by Dr. Christopher Looby, Professor of English at UCLA. Dr. Looby's talk, "Of Billy's Time" will explore the relationship between queer sexuality, historicism, and narrative organization in Herman Melville's classic novella, Billy Budd, Sailor

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Friday, September 26, 2014

Ron Hansen Lecture

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Location: Geddes Hall Auditorium

Ron Hansenk

Ron Hansen, author of author of eight novels (including A Wild Surge of Guilty Passion, Exiles, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, and Mariette in Ecstasy) and three short story collections, will present the lecture "Seeing into the Middle of Things: On Being a Catholic Writer" this Friday, September 26, at 4:30 pm in Geddes Hall Auditorium. …

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Monday, September 29, 2014

Religion & Literature Annual Lecture: Robin Kirkpatrick

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Location: Rare Books Reading Room, Hesburgh Library

robin_kirkpatrick

Religion and Literature at Notre Dame is very pleased to announce the visit to Notre Dame of Robin Kirkpatrick, Professor Emeritus of Italian and English Literatures, University of Cambridge (Robinson College). On Monday, September 29th at 4.30 pm, in the Reading Room of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections of the Hesburgh Library, Professor Kirkpatrick will deliver the annual Religion & Literature lecture, on the topic "The Pace of Praise: Might Theology Walk Together with Literature?"

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Wednesday, October 8, 2014

2014 Joseph M. Duffy Lecture: David Fairer

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Location: McKenna Hall Lower Level

The English Department is pleased to announce that our 2013 Duffy Lecturer is David Fairer, Professor of Eighteenth-Century Literature at the University of Leeds. The 2014 Duffy Lecture will take place at 5:00 pm, Tuesday, October 7 (location TBA). A reception will follow.

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Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Americanist Seminar: Nan Z. Da

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Location: 119 DeBartolo

The English Department is pleased to announce its next Americanist Seminar speaker, Nan Z. Da, who joined the English faculty this year. Nan will speak on "Intransitive Transnationalisms" at 5:00 pm Tuesday, October 14, in 119 DeBartolo.

Using examples from nineteenth-century Sino-US "exchange," this talk provokes us to wonder if transnationalism, a rhetoric and methodology that depends on the consequentiality of literary-cultural contact, was a historical phenomenon that produced the very romance of literary impact. It shows there to be a logical, if paradoxical, relationship between what transnationalism makes us believe the literature of others can do, and the minimal adjustments that describes so much of transnational interactions. …

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Friday, October 31, 2014

Gender Studies Research Workshop: Laura L. Knoppers

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Location: 119 O'Shaughnessy

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“Her Good Desire”: Margaret Cavendish, Humoral Medicine, and Early Modern Infertility

Abstract: This presentation considers a little-explored side of the prolific seventeenth-century writer Margaret Cavendish by examining medical material in the family correspondence in the Portland Collection, University of Nottingham.  Writing to William Cavendish, Marquis (and later Duke) of Newcastle, with prescriptions to treat melancholy, hypochondria, impotence, and infertility, chemical Galenist Sir Theodore de Mayerne adds salutations to Margaret for “the accomplishment of her good desire” in bearing children.  Margaret proved, in Mayerne’s view, a difficult patient, who insisted on following her own regimen in purging, fasting, and blood-letting. And, in the event, the couple remained childless. Nonetheless, as the final portion of the presentation will explore, Margaret productively reworks humoral concepts of balance, temperance, conception, and birth in her writings and in fashioning herself as author, issuing forth poems, plays, letters, and philosophical prose.  My focus on humoral medicine and gendered infertility provides a new lens on the debated issue of the conventionality versus the proto-feminism of Cavendish’s scientific thought.  …

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Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Sandeen Reading: Philip Levine & Christina Pugh

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Location: McKenna Hall Auditorium

The English Department is pleased to announce that the readers of the inaugural Ernest Sandeen Memorial Reading are Philip Levine and Christina Pugh.  A hallmark of the Sandeen reading series is that the senior poet who is selected is asked to choose a younger poet to read with him or her on the same evening, thereby honoring the memory of Ernest Sandeen, who is renowned both as a poet and a teacher for many decades at the University of Notre Dame. Levine and Pugh will share the microphone on November 5, 2014 in the McKenna Hall auditorium at 7:30 pm.…

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Thursday, November 13, 2014

Thadious Davis Lecture

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Location: 100 McKenna Hall

thadious_davis

The English Department is pleased to announce a guest lecture by 2014-2015 NDIAS Director's Fellow Thadious M. Davis entitled "Contending With Force: African American Imaginative Freedom." The lecture will take place on Thursday, November 13, at 5:00 pm in 100 McKenna Hall. A reception will follow.…

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