Each creative writing course at Notre Dame is unique to the professor teaching the course. As such, there are no generic descriptions for creative writing courses at the university. Instead, we offer a variety of teaching methods and approaches to the subject which students may choose from in order to best fit their specific goals. Below are examples of the courses offered.

Spring 2019

 

ENGL 90011-01
Graduate Fiction Workshop
Steve Tomasula
R 6:30-9:15

A fiction workshop for graduate students in the MFA in Creative Writing program, with an emphasis on students developing their own aesthetic and personal vision, juxtaposed to and within the larger movement of the contemporary literary world.
 

ENGL 90038-01
Graduate Poetry Workshop
Orlando Menes
TR 11:00-12:15

Our goal in this class is to lock in on our vision for our own writing and help others to lock in on theirs. We will do this by reading widely and diversely and thinking about the aesthetic, occult and political powers of poetry in our contemporary and pre-contemporary publishing universes. We will read across cultures and languages with an open and receptive ear, eye, heart and brain, ready to be changed by poetry. We will think about poetry as a medium among media and we will test our ideas by encountering texts and artworks that we do not normally think of as poetry at all.
 

ENGL 90042-01/ ENGL 40042-01
The Weird, the Uncanny, and the Grotesque
Johannes Goransson
TR 9:30-10:45

This class will focus on some of the many weird and uncanny ways grotesque aesthetics has popped up in art, literature and pop culture over the past 100 years. Whether it is in Dadaistic cut-ups, Kara Walker’s silhouette atrocities, David Lynch’s para-noir crime movies, or the apocalyptic graphic novel Wolf, works that venture into the weird or grotesque challenge common representations of the body, the human, alterity and violence. In the process they often subvert or simply ignore established norms of decency, taste and morality. Some of the time these excesses appear decadently apolitical, at other times tastelessly political. We will explore the politics and anti-politics, the beauty and the ugliness of these modes in both critical and creative responses to these works.