Each creative writing course at Notre Dame is unique to the professor teaching the course. As such, there are no generic descriptions for creative writing courses at the university. Instead, we offer a variety of teaching methods and approaches to the subject which students may choose from in order to best fit their specific goals. Below are examples of the courses offered.

Fall 2018

 

ENGL 90013
Graduate Fiction Workshop
Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi
R 12:30-3:15

A fiction workshop for graduate students in the MFA in Creative Writing program, with an emphasis on students developing their own aesthetic and personal vision, juxtaposed to and within the larger movement of the contemporary literary world.

 

ENGL 90038
Graduate Poetry Workshop
Joyelle McSweeney
TR 9:30-10:45

Our goal in this class is to lock in on our vision for our own writing and help others to lock in on theirs. We will do this by reading widely and diversely and thinking about the aesthetic, occult and political powers of poetry in our contemporary and pre-contemporary publishing universes. We will read across cultures and languages with an open and receptive ear, eye, heart and brain, ready to be changed by poetry. We will think about poetry as a medium among media and we will test our ideas by encountering texts and artworks that we do not normally think of as poetry at all.

 

ENGL 90092
Practicum: Teaching Creative Writing
Johannes Goransson
W 3:30-4:45

In this course we'll work collaboratively to think through the practical, theoretical, institutional, interpersonal, political, and, oh yes, artistic implications of teaching creative writing at various types of academic institutions as well as in community settings.
 

ENGL 90930/ ENGL 40930
& Now: Literature as Contemporary Art
Steve Tomasula
TR 3:30-4:45p

&NOW is a course focused on writing as a contemporary art form. We’ll be reading novels, short stories, and poetry in which authors have done what authors always do: deform language in order to transform ordinary speech into art. But anyone who steps away from the bestseller lists can see that the literary landscape is just as wild as that of visual art, just as varied: poems in the forms of installations, performance, and demonstrations, or written by machines; novels in the form of dioramas; stories told as recipes or tattoos, poems in skywriting or genetic code, pixels, skin—as well as the printed book. &NOW will take up print novels, print short fiction and poetry as well as electronic writing, and other hybrid forms that push their politics, develop their ideas, or create reading experiences through an exploration of language and/or materials. Sometimes called experimental, conceptual, avant-garde, hybrid, postmodern, innovative, extreme, alternative, electronic, anti-, or new literature, we will read a range of works from the early years of this century to the present. Students will be encouraged to engage with this work either through writing about it, or contributing to it as the course will be held in conjunction with the &NOW Festival of Writing as a Contemporary Art to be held at Notre Dame (visit https://www.andnow2018.com/). Our readings will include prose, poetry, hypermedia and writing of indeterminate breed from authors visiting campus for the festival as well as others. A potential reading list includes Mark Z. Danielewski House of Leaves, Claudia Rankine, Citizen; David Clark, 88 Constellations for Wittgenstein <www.88constellations.net/88.html; Salvador Placencia, People of Paper; Nam Le, “The Boat” <www.sbs.com.au/theboat/>; The Meursault Investigation by Kamel Daoud; Ann Carson, Nox; and others….

 

ENGL 92011
Practicum: Literary Publishing
Johannes Goransson
W 5:00-6:15

A review of the current state of literary publishing in the U.S. and abroad.