Literature Requirement

Fall 2021

ENGL 20106-01-02
Point-of-View in the Novel
Noreen Deane-Moran
MW 12:30-1:45
Section 01 - Unallocated
Section 03 - Freshmen

This course will focus on the introduction to the novel as a form, a means to view the world of the author/artist and the reader. Literature is an art whereby one consciousness seeks to communicate with another consciousness. One of the artist's techniques for controlling this flow is the concept of point of view. We will explore various approaches and uses of this "framing" in some nineteenth and twentieth century novels. The goal is to use an understanding of point of view to more fully comprehend, enjoy, and sensitively read this popular genre. Texts: Henry James, Turn of the Screw; Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights; Edith Wharton, Ethan Frome; James Joyce, Dubliners; William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!; Carson McCullers, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter; E. L. Doctorow, Ragtime; Roddy Doyle, Paddy Clarke, Ha, Ha; and Richard Brautigan, Trout Fishing in America. Requirements: regular class participation; two short papers, a mid-term; and a final.
 

ENGL 20106-03-04
Point-of-View in the Novel
Noreen Deane-Moran
MW 3:30-4:45
Section 02 - Unallocated
Section 04 - Freshmen

This course will focus on the introduction to the novel as a form, a means to view the world of the author/artist and the reader. Literature is an art whereby one consciousness seeks to communicate with another consciousness. One of the artist's techniques for controlling this flow is the concept of point of view. We will explore various approaches and uses of this "framing" in some nineteenth and twentieth century novels. The goal is to use an understanding of point of view to more fully comprehend, enjoy, and sensitively read this popular genre. Texts: Henry James, Turn of the Screw; Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights; Edith Wharton, Ethan Frome; James Joyce, Dubliners; William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!; Carson McCullers, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter; E. L. Doctorow, Ragtime; Roddy Doyle, Paddy Clarke, Ha, Ha; and Richard Brautigan, Trout Fishing in America. Requirements: regular class participation; two short papers, a mid-term; and a final.

 

ENGL 20156
The First  Amendment: Free Speech in the Digital Age
Elliott Visconsi
MW 9:30-10:45  
Sec. 01 - Freshmen
Sec. 02 - Sophomore
Sec. 03 - Juniors
Sec. 04 - Seniors

This introductory course surveys the core texts, doctrines, ideas, and cultural controversies related to First Amendment protections for free expression. We will be especially interested in some large questions: what is expression? How have our ideas of freedom of expression evolved as we enter the digital age? What kind of expression should be permissible? What happens when the public forum is fully online? What is the relationship between free expression and democratic-self government? Is there a difference between individual, group, and government speech? How do we navigate alternative ways of thinking about free expression in a global media ecosystem? We will consider a selection of exemplary cases, controversies, and literary texts: among our topics will include the following: the transformation of speech in the age of digital media; libel, satire and parody; piracy, intellectual property and copyright; privacy and surveillance; hate speech and incitement; obscenity and pornography. We will investigate the topic by studying relevant case law, literary texts (including fiction, film and new media), political philosophy, and information policy. Disclaimer: you will encounter speech that is potentially offensive and discomforting in this course. 

 

ENGL 20246-01-02
The Common Good and Renaissance Humanism in 16th and 17th c. England
Alex Chun
TR 3:30-4:45
Sec 01 - Unallocated
Sec 02 - Freshmen

While the rise of the individual has long been understood as a defining aspect of early modern England (16th and 17th century), this period is also a time when the ideas of the common good and the commonwealth (res publica) became central topics of intellectual conversations. In this course, we will examine how early modern contemporaries in England attempted to understand, define, and reconcile the idea of the individual with the promotion of the common good. This course focuses on the works of English Renaissance humanists from Thomas More to John Milton who sought to comprehend the present and imagine a better future by looking back toward the classical past. In examining these scholars' attitudes toward antiquity, students are encouraged to reflect on their own relationship with the past in order to navigate the current political climate where values of the common good are perceived as antithetical to individual rights and freedom.

 

ENGL 20320-01-02
Sociable Women and the “Public” Sphere
Arpit Kumar
TR 9:30-10:45
Sec 01 - Unallocated
Sec 02 - Freshmen

German philosopher Jürgen Habermas’ “bourgeois public sphere” imagined an institution that briefly held sway in eighteenth century urban European societies. In sociable spaces, such as coffee-houses or taverns, men of different allegiances gathered to discuss politics and worldly affairs. While women have been assigned a marginal position in the story of European sociability, literary texts offer a different reality. What were women’s sociable spaces? What did it mean for a woman to be ‘sociable’? What was her stake in politics and worldly affairs? We will discuss how women writers and fictional heroines were redefining what constituted ‘public’ and ‘private’ while conducting politics in a distinct register. Whether it was the actress on the English stage, aristocratic women in French salons, the Bluestockings, or novelistic heroines shopping in London – the literary story of women’s sociability is one that needs telling. We will read texts from authors such as Madame de Lafayette, Frances Burney, Jane Austen, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Virginia Woolf.


 

ENGL 20550-01-02
Bad Behavior: Women Writers and the Making of Literary History
Trish Bredar
MW 9:30-10:45
Sec. 01 - Unallocated
Sec. 02 - Freshmen

If the popular phrase, “well-behaved women seldom make history,” holds true, then what forms of “bad behavior” have shaped the cannon of women’s literature? How and why did particular women writers gain in acclaim and popularity as others faded from view? In this class, we will explore how the creation and violation of gender expectations has shaped nineteenth-century women’s literature, its reception, and its modern reinterpretations. We will examine a wide range of literary figures, real and fictional alike, from pillars of propriety to unabashed rebels, from the nineteenth century and today. Readings will include work by Jane Austen, Anne Lister, Anne Brontë, Michael Field, Mary Seacole, and Virginia Woolf as well as contemporary television (Sally Wainwright’s Gentleman Jack), graphic novels (Isabel Greenburg’s Glasstown), and film (Park Chan-Wook’s The Handmaiden).

 

ENGL 20640-01-02
“How Fully Can We Feel in the Doing”:Labor in American Literature
Haylee Chavanne
MW 5:05-6:20
Section 01: Unallocated
Section 02: Freshmen

In this course, we will examine the role of labor in American literature from the decades before the Civil War to the late 20th century through the critical lens of Audre Lorde’s theorization of the erotic. Through this theorization, Lorde identifies the intimate and varying relationships to power that are revealed when gender identity, race, sexuality, and class intersect with labor in U.S. American culture. We will critically examine what these classed, gendered, and raced aspects of labor reveal about American culture, ideology, identity, and future trajectories. We will interrogate, reflect, and deconstruct how writers affirm, challenge, and negotiate identity and conceptualize American society through representations of labor.


 

ENGL 20740-01-02
Novels of New York
Noreen Deane-Moran
TR 5:05-6:20
Section 01 - Unallocated
Section 02 - Freshmen 

Knowledge presents itself in many forms. And it is the very shape of this form which perhaps gives us the greater part of the information. It has long been said that form and content must mesh for there to be beauty and inspiration. The books here are housed in the area called Literature, and thus it is the written word which is the chosen outer form. But, within that box are many varied elements which each give their own spirit to the work. They do that by squeezing the essence of their meaning into a certain shape or form which in itself creates much of the meaning of the artistic work. Potential books: Washington Square - Henry James (1880); Maggie: A Girl of the Streets - Stephen Crane (1893); The Age of Innocence - Edith Wharton (1820); The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald (1925); A Tree Grows in Brooklyn - Betty Smith (1943); A Walker in the City - Alfred Kazin (1951); A Fairytale of New York - J.P. Donleavy (1973); Billy Bathgate - E. L. Doctorow (1990).

 

30xxx Level Courses

ENGL 30101-02-03
Intro to Literary Studies
Laura Betz
TR 11:00-12:15
Sec 02 - Majors
Sec 03 - Freshmen

This course provides beginning English majors with experience in the analysis, interpretation, and appreciation of literary works of different kinds and eras. Texts assigned will vary from one section to another, but all sections will include significant attention to poetry, as well as treatment of at least one other genre (fiction, drama, non-fiction prose). Frequent writing about works studied will introduce students to the practice of critical argument and consideration of how to read criticism as well as literature critically.

 

ENGL 30101-04-05
Intro to Literary Studies
Cyraina Johnson-Roullier
TR 11:00-12:15
Sec 04 - Majors
Sec 05 - Freshmen

This course provides beginning English majors with experience in the analysis, interpretation, and appreciation of literary works of different kinds and eras. Texts assigned will vary from one section to another, but all sections will include attention to poetry and at least one other genre (fiction, drama, non-fiction prose). Frequent writing about works studied will introduce students to the practice of critical argument and consideration of how to read criticism as well as literature critically.


 

ENGL 30101-06-07
Intro to Literary Studies
Sandra Gustafson
MW 3:30-4:45
Sec 06 - Majors
Sec 07 - Freshmen

This course provides beginning English majors with experience in the analysis, interpretation, and appreciation of literary works of different kinds and eras. Texts assigned will vary from one section to another, but all sections will include attention to poetry and at least one other genre (fiction, drama, non-fiction prose). Frequent writing about works studied will introduce students to the practice of critical argument and consideration of how to read criticism as well as literature critically.


 

ENGL 30110-01-02
British Literary Traditions I
Tim Machan
MW 11:00-12:15
Sec 01 - Majors
Sec 02 - Unallocated 

This course surveys a selection of literature written prior to the end of the seventeenth century. We will concentrate on a variety of authors who have come to be considered significant for a variety of reasons, whether for their artistic achievements, their commentary on society, or their contributions to notions of literary history. Although attention will be given to historical perspective, the course will emphasize close reading and classroom discussion. 

 

ENGL 30115-01-02
American Literary Traditions I
Laura Walls
MW 2:00-3:15 
Sec 01 - Majors
Sec 02 - Unallocated

"Nations are narratives" - so our historians tell us. That means the voices of a nation's artists and writers help to tell us who we are, even to create our very identity as a nation. So what are the narratives of our nation, the United States? This course traces the emergence of what we now know as "America" from the small and struggling British colonies of Virginia and New England, founded early in the 1600s on lands cultivated for millennia by Native Americans. We will consider the early "contact zones" in which settler societies from Europe met and mingled with indigenous Native American cultures, languages, and literatures; the institution of slavery as the foundation of American economies, and the growing contributions of free and enslaved African-Americans to the development of a distinctive American voice and literary tradition; and the literature of the American Revolution that established the United States as an independent nation. Finally, we will conclude with several works from the American Renaissance that characterize an emerging modern American literary tradition.