Spring 2021

ENGL 20000
Introduction to Creative Writing
Marie Burns
MW 9:35-10:50
Section 01 - Seniors
Section 02 - Unallocated
Section 03 - Freshmen

Creative work is all around us, complex, nuanced, and intimately human. The voice that haunts every waking & sleeping hour, the cloudy spaces in between.
The dirt road, cracked windowpane, a fresh swath of cut grass. But really, what is narrative? Rhyme & lyric? Verse & essay? What kinds of craft elements do writers use and why? What do the relationships between readers, writers, and texts look like? In this class, we’ll take a look at these types of inquiries and more. We’ll get at the root of literary work, the creative process, and learn how to create & develop our own fiction, non-fiction, poetry. By covering a wide range of readings from both authors & poets, we’ll learn how to fully participate & thrive in stimulating artistic discussion as blossoming writers. Students will acquire the skills necessary to build, give, and receive constructive criticism, and by the end of the semester, display their completed work in writing portfolios.

ENGL 20000 
Introduction to Creative Writing
Valerie Vargas
TR 5:30-6:45
Section 04 - Seniors
Section 05 - Unallocated
Section 06 - Freshmen

In this course, we will develop perspectives in creative writing by exploring three genres: poetry, fiction, and hybrid prose. Through examining and writing multiple forms of literature we will develop skills in the poetics of language, and engage with form and style to discover our voices as interdisciplinary writers. 

 

ENGL 20000
Introduction to Creative Writing
Rebecca Gearhart
MW 3:55-5:10
Section 07 - Seniors
Section 08 - Unallocated
Section 09 - Freshmen

This class will take students on an exploration of writing fiction, poetry, plays, and creative nonfiction. Students will use world literatures, writings of the diaspora, folk tales, and works in translation as models for finding authorial voice and creating their own individual works. With these readings guiding our path, we will begin by examining individual tools such as narrative voice, point-of-view, setting, and image. We will then put these pieces together, delving into writing different forms of literature ranging from one-act plays to novel excerpts. Taking cues from the global literature community, students will develop an understanding of the choices and techniques they can employ to write the types of works they aspire to create. Students can expect to leave this class with a portfolio of polished work.

 

ENGL 20000
Introduction to Creative Writing
PJ Lombardo
TR 12:45-2:00
Section 10 - Seniors
Section 11 - Unallocated
Section 12 - Freshmen

As a means of sharpening our creative and analytical skills, this course will offer an investigation of poetry’s potential on a variety of fronts. We will survey both contemporary and historical works, assessing their aesthetic and social resonances, in order to generate poetry of our own. Students will learn the mechanics of a poem, fostering their ability to write both effectively and imaginatively. The writing accomplished over the course of this course will lead students towards a finished portfolio.

 

ENGL 20001
Introduction to Fiction Writing
Ahmad Aljawad
MW 11:10-12:25
Section 01 - Seniors
Section 02 - Unallocated
Section 03 - Freshmen 

In this course, you will learn how to create and revise your own fiction writing. You will be asked to analyze and discuss a variety of fiction to advance your understanding of how both fiction in general and own fiction function. In the same vein, you will be assigned writing assignments to foster learning and development as writers and readers. The class will begin with the various building blocks of fiction before culminating in workshops and completed stories.

 

ENGL 20001
Introduction to Fiction Writing
Jasmine Ortiz
MW 12:45-2:00
Section 07 - Seniors
Section 08 - Unallocated
Section 09 - Freshmen 

This class will allow students to explore fiction through a varied lens. We will look at a diverse group of short stories, longer excerpts of novels, folk tales, and flash fiction in an effort to hone and define our own authorial voices and creating individual works. With these readings as the class backbone, we will discuss and examine multiple fiction writing tools such as narrative voice, point-of-view, setting, and character. Honing these tools, we'll delve into writing different forms of fiction ranging from micro (flash) fiction to longer stories. 

 

ENGL 20002
Introduction to Poetry Writing
Elise Houcek
MW 9:35-10:50
Section 01 - Seniors
Section 02 - Unallocated
Section 03 - Freshmen

In this course, we will explore the worlds of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction writing with the ultimate goal of developing as writers ourselves. Students will engage with a variety of literary as well as non-literary texts (including music, film, visual art, and performance), and we will investigate the exciting ways in which the boundaries between genres or mediums often bend or blur. Through a combination of in-class and out of class writing exercises, students will begin to generate their own writing portfolios and start to hone in on their personal aesthetics. At the end of the course, we will celebrate our work as a community of writers in the form of a class reading. 

 

ENGL 20002
Introduction to Poetry Writing
Misael Osorio-Conde
MW 3:55-5:10
Section 04 - Seniors
Section 05 - Unallocated
Section 06 - Freshmen

In this intro to poetry writing course we will study the basic elements of contemporary poetic composition: language, image, tone, music, etc; the way these elements interact and relate to each other, and ways to manipulate them to construct our work. We will also analyze poetic form and the various ways in which such forms (sonnet, sestina, pastoral, nocturne, etc.) work as a way to generate material and get us started. An emphasis will be made on creating a ritual that would foment the writing habit and how the completion of a portfolio culminates and guides our poem sequencing.

 

ENGL 30853
Fiction Writing 
Greg Havrilak
MW 5:30-6:45

Adolescence has been called a period of “growth through opposition.” What a wonderful framing device for fictional narrative! In this course we will examine novels, stories, and memoirs that feature some of the most memorable portraits of adolescents ever penned. As we consider how various writers approached their crafting, you will compose your own pieces - two will be workshopped - using our models as springboards for your own fictional contemplation of striving towards growth. Readings include works by Stuart, Sittenfeld, Saunders, Coates, Burgess, Fowles, Palahniuk, and many others.

 

ENGL 40850
Advanced Fiction Writing 
Valerie Sayers
TR 2:20-3:35 

This course is for students who delight in writing fiction and have a good sense of how difficult it can be to write surprising, satisfying, multivalent work. Most students will have taken at least one prior creative writing course; graduate students who are not in the Creative Writing program and staff are welcome. Any undergraduate who has written independently is also welcome to submit a writing sample for consideration; please contact the professor at vsayers@nd.edu. As a workshop, we'll read each other's prose with an eye to reconceiving, rewriting, and refining. We'll also read a broad range of contemporary writers to explore the lay of the literary land, in print and online, and to challenge our own taste and expectations (writers will likely include Sigrid Nunez, Zadie Smith, and George Saunders). Finally, we'll explore the realities of literary publication and writing possibilities beyond college, including M.F.A. programs. 


ENGL 40851
Advanced Poetry Writing
Orlando Menes
TR 2:20-3:35

This class is for writers who have tried their hands at writing poetry and would like to push themselves further. We will read and write broadly, immersing ourselves in contemporary poetry and its traditional antecedents, as well as combing fiction, plays, visual art, film, music, and other media to find forms and techniques to try out in our poetry. We will draft, revise, improvise, workshop, critique and perform with and for each other, and we will also think about the means and media by which poetry is published. With our minds on the currents shaping, for good or ill, the world we live in, will deeply consider the possibility that poetry might change, enhance, redefine and ornament the world and make new worlds.

 

ENGL 40852
Advanced Fiction Writing II
Valerie Sayers
TR 2:20-3:35

This course is for students who have already completed Advanced Fiction, students who delight in writing fiction and have a good sense of how difficult it can be to write surprising, satisfying, multivalent work. As a workshop, we'll read each other's prose with an eye to reconceiving, rewriting, and refining. We'll also read a broad range of contemporary writers to explore the lay of the literary land, in print and online, and to challenge our own taste and expectations (writers will likely include Sigrid Nunez, Zadie Smith, and George Saunders). Finally, we'll explore the realities of literary publication and writing possibilities beyond college, including M.F.A. programs. 

 

ENGL 40855
Advanced Fiction Writing III
Valerie Sayers
TR 2:20-3:35

This course is for students who have completed Advanced Fiction II, who delight in writing fiction and have a good sense of how difficult it can be to write surprising, satisfying, multivalent work. As a workshop, we'll read each other's prose with an eye to reconceiving, rewriting, and refining. We'll also read a broad range of contemporary writers to explore the lay of the literary land, in print and online, and to challenge our own taste and expectations (writers will likely include Sigrid Nunez, Zadie Smith, and George Saunders). Finally, we'll explore the realities of literary publication and writing possibilities beyond college, including M.F.A. programs.