Fine Arts Requirement

FALL 2020

ENGL 20000-01-03
Introduction to Creative Writing
Aljawad Ahmad
MW 9:30-10:45
Section 01 - Seniors
Section 02 - Unallocated
Section 03 - Freshmen

In this course, students will be introduced to creating and revising their own poetry, creative non-fiction, or fiction writing. They will be asked to analyze and discuss examples of these genres while also being tasked with a variety of writing assignments to foster their learning and development as writers and readers.


 

ENGL 20000-04-06
Introduction to Creative Writing
Jasmine Ortiz
MW 3:30-4:45
Section 04 - Seniors
Section 05 - Unallocated
Section 06 - Freshmen

In this class, we will explore writing by practicing the art, and also by doing a substantial amount of reading in the fiction, poetry, and nonfiction genres. Concentrating on the question of what makes any form of writing successful, students will be given the tools and allotted the time to write poems, essays, and short stories, while also building a strong vocabulary for discussion regarding reading and writing. 


 

ENGL 20000-07-09
Introduction to Creative Writing
Elise Houcek
TR 2:00-3:15
Section 07 - Seniors
Section 08 - Unallocated
Section 09 - Freshmen

In this course, we will explore the worlds of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction writing with the ultimate goal of developing as writers ourselves. Students will engage with a variety of literary as well as non-literary texts (including music, film, visual art, and performance), and we will investigate the exciting ways in which the boundaries between genres or mediums often bend or blur. Through a combination of in-class and out of class writing exercises, students will begin to generate their own writing portfolios and start to hone in on their personal aesthetics. At the end of the course, we will celebrate our work as a community of writers in the form of a class reading.

 

ENGL 20001-01-03
Introduction to Fiction Writing
Marie Burns
MW 5:05-6:20
Section 01 - Seniors
Section 02 - Unallocated
Section 03 - Freshmen

Stories! Oh stories. Dusty dirt roads, freshly cut grass, a cracked windowpane. Where to begin? Narrative is all around us, complex, nuanced, and intimately human. The voice that haunts every waking, sleeping hour, the cloudy spaces in between. But really, just what is fiction? What does it mean to tell a tale? What kinds of craft elements do writers use and why? What do the relationships between readers, writers, and texts look like? In this class, we’ll take a look at these types of inquiries and more. We’ll get at the root of storytelling, learn how to participate and thrive in stimulating artistic discussion, engage with literary works as blossoming writers. By the end of workshop, you’ll gain a greater understanding of the creative process, and acquire the skills necessary to build, give, and receive constructive criticism.

 

ENGL 20001-04-06
Introduction to Fiction Writing
Rebecca Gearhart
MW 9:30-10:45
Section 04 - Seniors
Section 05 - Unallocated
Section 06 - Freshmen

This class will take students on an exploration of writing fiction through a multicultural lens. Students will use world literatures, writings of the diaspora, folk tales, and works in translation as models for finding authorial voice and creating their own individual works. With these readings guiding our path, we will begin by examining individual tools such as narrative voice, point-of-view, setting, and character. We will then put these pieces together, delving into writing different forms of fiction ranging from flash fiction to the novel. Taking cues from the global literature community, students will develop an understanding of the choices and techniques they can employ to write the types of work they aspire to create.  


 

ENGL 20002-01-03
Introduction to Poetry Writing
Misael Osorio-Conde
MW 3:30-4:45
Section 01 - Seniors
Section 02 - Unallocated
Section 03 - Freshmen

In this intro to poetry writing course we will study the basic elements of contemporary poetic composition: language, image, tone, music, etc; the way these elements interact and relate to each other, and ways to manipulate them to construct our work. We will also analyze poetic form and the various ways in which such forms (sonnet, sestina, pastoral, nocturne, etc.) work as a way to generate material and get us started. An emphasis will be made on creating a ritual that would foment the writing habit and how the completion of a portfolio culminates and guides our poem sequencing.


 

ENGL 20002
Introduction to Poetry Writing
Philip Lombardo
TR 2:00-3:15
Section 04 - Seniors
Section 05 - Unallocated
Section 06 - Freshmen

As a means of sharpening our creative and analytical skills, this course will offer an investigation of poetry’s potential on a variety of fronts. We will survey both contemporary and historical works, assessing their aesthetic and social resonances, in order to generate poetry of our own. Students will learn the mechanics of a poem, fostering their ability to write both effectively and imaginatively. The writing accomplished over the course of this course will lead students towards a finished portfolio.


 

ENGL 20002-07-09
Introduction to Poetry Writing
Valerie Vargas
MW 5:05-6:20
Section 07 - Seniors 
Section 08 - Unallocated 
Section 09 - Freshmen

Develop perspectives in poetry in order to expand our understanding of the world we live in. We will spend time building a literary toolbox by developing skills in poetic form, figurative language, and style. The second half of the course will be dedicated to exploring content and using our literary tools to create poetry. You will leave this course with a new engagement in poetry and language. 

 

ENGL 30009
Writing the Anthropocene
Roy Scranton
MW 11:00-12:15

We face worldwide ecological catastrophe, accelerating global warming, and political upheaval: this is the Anthropocene. What problems does the Anthropocene pose to narrative? What storytelling skills and rhetorical strategies do journalists, scientists, memoirists, bloggers, and philosophers need in order to adequately address and communicate about the epochal crisis we all face? Through journalism, essays, and other media, this course will explore the question - in practice - of what it means to write the Anthropocene.

 

ENGL 30851
Poetry Writing
Sara Judy
MW 9:30-10:45

The poet Mary Ruefle writes that poetry is nothing more than "a wandering little drift of unidentified sound," sound that we can follow, and listen to, but never find its source. In this course, we will do our best to follow the drift, as we read a diverse array of writers, and discuss a range of aesthetic, formal, personal and political possibilities in poetry. Students will read and write extensively both in and out of class throughout the semester, as we experiment with a variety of composition styles and techniques, present and perform poetry, and complete two larger projects consisting of a curated anthology which puts their own poetry in conversation with others, and a creative project of their own design. 


 

ENGL 30853
Fiction Writing 
Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi
TR 2:00-3:15

In her book Wonderlust: A History of Walking, Rebecca Sulnit writes, "The rhythm of walking generates a kind of rhythm of thinking, and the passage through a landscape echoes or stimulates the passage through a series of thoughts." In this course we will examine notions of journey, pilgrimage, space and subjectivity through the lens of walking. We will look at representations of walking in a variety of genres: essay, graphic novel, fiction, film, prose and poetry and use the practice of walking as a platform to write provocative texts that contemplate the body, architecture, language, philosophy, religion, nature, music and film. Students will engage with course themes and motifs by writing fictions, poems and essays of their own.  

 

ENGL 40850
Advanced Fiction Writing 
Roy Scranton
MW 2:00-3:15 

What are the poetics of prose? How do we make voices speak on the page? In this reading-intensive workshop, we will approach these questions through philosophy, literary theory, close reading, and experimental practice. The strange technology of writing easily turns invisible in its everyday familiarity - in order to see fiction-making in all its deep weirdness, we must be willing to take it apart, break it, and remake it. We will perform our experiments with the seriousness of scientists and play with the abandon of the possessed, for as much as writing is a technology, it is also an attunement, a moment shaping collective vibrations as they pass through gatherings of cells. Readings may include work by Plato, Gertrude Stein, Ishmael Reed, David Foster Wallace, Carmen Maria Machado, and others.


 

ENGL 40852
Advanced Fiction Writing II
Roy Scranton
MW 2:00-3:15

This course is intended for students who have already taken an Advanced Fiction Writing and who are seriously interested in writing fiction.

What are the poetics of prose? How do we make voices speak on the page? In this reading-intensive workshop, we will approach these questions through philosophy, literary theory, close reading, and experimental practice. The strange technology of writing easily turns invisible in its everyday familiarity - in order to see fiction-making in all its deep weirdness, we must be willing to take it apart, break it, and remake it. We will perform our experiments with the seriousness of scientists and play with the abandon of the possessed, for as much as writing is a technology, it is also an attunement, a moment shaping collective vibrations as they pass through gatherings of cells. Readings may include work by Plato, Gertrude Stein, Ishmael Reed, David Foster Wallace, Carmen Maria Machado, and others.


ENGL 40855
Advanced Fiction Writing III
Roy Scranton
MW 2:00-3:15

This course is intended for students who have already taken an Advanced Fiction Writing and who are seriously interested in writing fiction.

What are the poetics of prose? How do we make voices speak on the page? In this reading-intensive workshop, we will approach these questions through philosophy, literary theory, close reading, and experimental practice. The strange technology of writing easily turns invisible in its everyday familiarity - in order to see fiction-making in all its deep weirdness, we must be willing to take it apart, break it, and remake it. We will perform our experiments with the seriousness of scientists and play with the abandon of the possessed, for as much as writing is a technology, it is also an attunement, a moment shaping collective vibrations as they pass through gatherings of cells. Readings may include work by Plato, Gertrude Stein, Ishmael Reed, David Foster Wallace, Carmen Maria Machado, and others.