Fine Arts Requirement

Spring 2019


ENGL 20000
Introduction to Creative Writing
Patricia Hartland
MW 5:05-6:20
Section 01 - Seniors
Section 02 - Unallocated
Section 03 - Freshmen

In this course together we will forge a community that seeks to question the parameters and potentials of genre. While cultivating a dynamic space of experimentation, creative risk-taking, and honest discussion, this course will aim to adapt to the particular interests and questions of the community; in doing so we will read widely and explore deeply while stretching our creative-writing hands. We will cross-pollinate fiction, poetry, screenwriting, translation, and intermediate works as we dialogue with contemporary authors to hone-in on new understanding. Douglas Kearney, Matthea Harvey, Gwendolyn Brooks, Koffi Kwhaulé, and Layli Long Soldier are just a few of the many voices that will inform our explorations.

 

ENGL 20000
Introduction to Creative Writing
Jake McCabe
MW 12:30-1:45

Section 04 - Seniors
Section 05 - Unallocated
Section 06 - Freshmen

This lively class introduces you to the writing of fiction, poetry and other genres. Students will study published works in various media, try their hands at writing in an array of forms and genres, share their work with others, and receive feedback that lets them improve their craft. By the end of the semester, you will have a facility with the forms, genres, and media of contemporary writing, a portfolio of work to build on in other courses or on your own. Please see the English Department website for an individualized description for each section of this course.

 

ENGL 20000
Introduction to Creative Writing
AM Ringwalt
MW 9:30-10:45
Section 07 - Seniors
Section 08 - Unallocated
Section 09 - Freshmen

In Introduction to Creative Writing, I invite you to develop an intimate, intellectual and social relationship to poetry and fiction. Roland Barthes, in his “Death of the Author,” says: “writing is the destruction of every voice, of every distinct point of origin.” As we acquire an understanding of and relationship to the elements of poetry and fiction, we will explore—and move from—our distinct points of origin. We will work to understand and relate to poetry and fiction through reading collected works, individual poems and stories, and supplementary essays, which we will respond to. We will generate new work, engage in collective discussion to further our words’ trajectories (“workshop”) and, ultimately, complete mini-portfolios as artifacts of our shared learning and engagement with the written word.

 

ENGL 20002
Introduction to Poetry Writing

Joyelle McSweeney
MW 11:00-12:15

Section 01 - Seniors
Section 02 - Freshmen
Section 03 - Unallocated

This course invites you to build on the basics, develop your technical abilities, and broaden your approaches to the form, genres, media, language, and performance of contemporary poetry. Students should expect to read and view works from a variety of periods and cultures, and will generate their own poems in response to course readings and prompts as well as their own impromptu in-class writing. Students will also sharpen their critical vocabulary as they analyze assigned readings, critique peer work, and receive critiques of their poems from both peers and instructor. Specific readings, activities and assignments will differ from section to section.

 

ENGL 20002
Introduction to Poetry Writing

Shinan Xu
MW 2:00-3:15
Section 04 - Seniors
Section 05 - Unallocated
Section 06 - Freshmen

In this class, you will familiarize yourself with basic elements of poetry (e.g., imagery, line breaks, sounds & diction). We will read a variety of both contemporary poems and works from earlier centuries to enhance our writing skills as a community of writers. We will also move beyond the craft level to reflect on how we conceptualize the thematic concerns of our writings and establish a theoretical framework to comprehend each other’s poetic trajectory. In class, we will read and engage with lyrical essays and critical theories (e.g., abject theory, Michel Foucault’s Panopticon). These readings will serve as start point for us to explore how ideas make art/poetry and how craft interweaves with ideas.
 

ENGL 20002
Introduction to Poetry Writing
Jacob Schepers
MW 3:30-4:45
Section 07 - Seniors
Section 08 - Unallocated
Section 09 - Freshmen

This course will give us a chance to “look under the hood” of poetry and the writing of it. We will read a diverse array of modern and contemporary poetry and discuss a wide range of poetic techniques and characteristics in order to develop both our own poetic writing and our individual aesthetic interests and ideas. In particular, we will consider how poetry’s supposed “tools and rules”—including sound, image, line, constraint, and address, among many others—can make a poem tick. At the same time, we will also think about when and how heightening, modifying, and abandoning those tools and breaking those rules can detonate the poem and turn that ticking into a boom.

As an introduction to poetry writing, no prior knowledge of poetic craft, tradition, or texts is necessary. What will be required is engaged participation, robust discussion, and weekly writing exercises, as well as three larger projects consisting of a student-led presentation, a brief manifesto, and a poetry portfolio which will be due by semester’s end.
 

ENGL 20003
Introduction to Fiction Writing

Jac Smith
MW 2:00-3:15
Section 01 - Seniors
Section 02 - Unallocated
Section 03 - Freshmen

In this course, students will learn techniques to aid in the crafting of stories inspired from both life and imagination. We will explore components of short story writing such as: plot, setting, character, description, point of view, dialogue, tone, voice and theme. Class time will be spent analyzing fiction, talking craft, and giving feedback on each other’s work. Come prepared to read with intention and to write with vigor. Together we will build a writing community where everyone’s vision is taken seriously. Artistic support is a key component to the success of this classroom. What you say matters. What you create matters. With a heavy emphasis on drafting and revision, this course will provide students with the tools to better understand fiction writing.
 

ENGL 20003
Introduction to Fiction Writing
Joseph Thomas
MW 11:00-12:15
Section 07 - Seniors
Section 08 - Unallocated
Section 09 - Freshmen

In this course we will study contemporary writing with the goal of students crafting and workshopping their own short stories, novel excerpts and/or narrative non-fiction. We will primarily read writers of color in order to better examine the relationships between the social, the aesthetic, and visual media’s impact on writing in the 21st Century. Authors will likely include N.K. Jemisin, Ingrid Rojas Contreras, Kiese Laymon, Achy Obejas, Muriel Leung and Nafissa Thompson-Spires.
 

ENGL 20008
Introduction to Creative Nonfiction
Sara Marcus
TR 11:00-12:15
Section 01 - Seniors
Section 02 - Unallocated

Section 03 - Freshmen

In writing creative nonfiction, we respond to what we see and experience in the world, shaping our impressions into art. Throughout this introductory course, we will read and write nonfiction in a variety of genres, including criticism, memoir, manifesto, literary journalism, and lyric essay. The class will combine seminar-style discussion, directed writing exercises, and opportunities to workshop one another's writing.

 

ENGL 30850
Fiction Writing for Majors
Steve Tomasula
TR 2:00-3:15
Sec 01 - Majors
Sec 02 - Unallocated

This is a course in writing short fiction for English majors who come to writing with a broader literary background than non-majors. It is conducted through a discussion format centered on fiction written by students in the class, and in the context of readings drawn from the contemporary, literary landscape. Students will be encouraged to explore how style and language create aesthetic experience and convey ideas. No one type of fiction is advocated over another, and the emphasis in the class will vary from section to section; however, students will be expected to write fiction that demonstrates an awareness of the difference between serious literature and formula entertainment.

 

ENGL 30851
Poetry Writing

Joyelle McSweeney
MW 9:30-10:45

This is a course for students who are ready to immerse themselves in the strange contagious waters of poetry. We’ll read across regions, languages, communities and time periods to connect to poetry’s aesthetic, formal, and political urgencies and possibilities, and we’ll write an array of poems of our own. Expect to write individual lyrics as well as prose poems, letters, verse plays, sound poems, collages, remixes, performance pieces, and verse plays, and to poke around in the traditional and digital media by which poems have been shared. I’ll expect you to write in- and out- of class poems, work collaboratively on group projects and translations, present, perform, participate, offer kind supportive feedback on peer work., and propose and execute a final project of your own devising. Attendance is mandatory.

 

ENGL 40850
Advanced Fiction Writing
Roy Scranton
MW 3:30-4:45

What are the poetics of prose? How do we make voices speak on the page? In this reading-intensive workshop, we will approach these questions through philosophy, literary theory, close reading, and experimental practice. The strange technology of writing easily turns invisible in its everyday familiarity - in order to see fiction-making in all its deep weirdness, we must be willing to take it apart, break it, and remake it. We will perform our experiments with the seriousness of scientists and play with the abandon of the possessed, for as much as writing is a technology, it is also an attunement, a moment shaping collective vibrations as they pass through gatherings of cells. Readings will include work by Gertrude Stein, M. NourbeSe Philip, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Jorge Luis Borges, Jane Bowles, and others.

 

ENGL 40852
Advanced Fiction Writing II
Roy Scranton
MW 3:30-4:45

This course is intended for students who have already taken an Advanced Fiction Writing and who are seriously interested in writing fiction.What are the poetics of prose? How do we make voices speak on the page? In this reading-intensive workshop, we will approach these questions through philosophy, literary theory, close reading, and experimental practice. The strange technology of writing easily turns invisible in its everyday familiarity - in order to see fiction-making in all its deep weirdness, we must be willing to take it apart, break it, and remake it. We will perform our experiments with the seriousness of scientists and play with the abandon of the possessed, for as much as writing is a technology, it is also an attunement, a moment shaping collective vibrations as they pass through gatherings of cells. Readings will include work by Gertrude Stein, M. NourbeSe Philip, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Jorge Luis Borges, Jane Bowles, and others.

 

ENGL 40855
Advanced Fiction Writing III
Roy Scranton
MW 3:30-4:45

This course is intended for students who have already taken an Advanced Fiction Writing and who are seriously interested in writing fiction. The expectation is that the student is beyond the point of requiring assignments to generate stories. Over the semester, in a workshop setting, student stories will be taken through various stages: due attention will be paid to revision, rewriting, polishing, editing, with a goal that the stories be brought as close as possible to the point of submission as finished work. Practical as well as theoretical issues will be investigated; there will be assigned readings from a variety of fiction authors.