Fine Arts Requirement

Spring 2020

ENGL 20000
Introduction to Creative Writing
Nazli Koca
MW 9:30-10:45
Section 01 - Seniors
Section 02 - Unallocated
Section 03 - Freshmen

In this class, we will explore the art of writing by reading the works of authors from different areas of the world who use various avenues of literature such as Elena Ferrante, Kathy Acker, Sylvia Plath, and Franz Kafka. Students will be given the tools and the space to craft poems, short stories, novel excerpts, and pieces of narrative nonfiction. We will discuss how reading improves our life and writing skills. We will write and review stories that are courageous and unique in a supportive and constructive workshop throughout the semester. 

 

ENGL 20000 
Introduction to Creative Writing
Natasha Ali
MW 3:30-4:45
Section 04 - Seniors
Section 05 - Unallocated
Section 06 - Freshmen

This section of ENGL 20000 caters to students who love to read, wish to write, and yearn to engage with literature, both published and in-progress. Concentrating on the question of what makes successful narrative – whether we are constructing fantasy worlds or relating our own lived experiences – this course will see us read, study, and write an amalgam of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.
 

ENGL 20000
Introduction to Creative Writing
Maxime Berclaz
TR 11:00-12:15
Section 07 - Seniors
Section 08 - Unallocated
Section 09 - Freshmen

This course will provide students with an introduction to writing both fiction and poetry. In terms of poetry we will cover an equal range of contemporary, avant-garde, and historical writers, while terms of fiction we will look at works that fall on either side of the literary/genre distinction. You will learn a range of techniques from both mediums and how each can strengthen the other, along with the general craft of writing. By the end of the course you will have produced a portfolio of fiction and poetry, reviewed by your peers and edited by you. 

 

ENGL 20001
Introduction to Fiction Writing
Kirsten Aquilar
MW 5:05-6:20
Section 01 - Seniors
Section 02 - Unallocated
Section 03 - Freshmen 

In this course we’ll dive headfirst into the art and craft of fiction writing. We’ll read like writers, write intensively and cultivate a literary community in our classroom. Our readings will be broad and varied in order to study, engage with and try out a range of techniques and forms. Through workshop, we’ll learn how to constructively critique and revise both our own work and our peers’. Students will come away from this course with a polished portfolio of writing. Readings will include authors such as Elena Ferrante, Angela Carter, Han Kang, Lesley Nneka Arimah, and many others. 

 

ENGL 20001
Introduction to Fiction Writing
Greg Havrilak
TR 2:00-3:15
Section 07 - Seniors
Section 08 - Unallocated
Section 09 - Freshmen 

This course is devoted to the craft of story-writing. Each week we will analyze classic and contemporary stories, novellas, novel excerpts, stand-up routines, and/or essays on the craft, vetting the components of effective written narrative. Along the way you will try your hand at various writing prompts, and submit short fiction pieces of your own. Readings include work by Maile Meloy, Adam Johnson, Roxane Gay, Gish Jen, George Saunders, Jamel Brinkley, and others.

 

ENGL 20002
Introduction to Poetry Writing
Sebastian Bostwick
MW 2:00-3:15
Section 01 - Seniors
Section 02 - Unallocated
Section 03 - Freshmen

What is poetry? Poetry is painting. Poetry is the way sun slants through summer foliage just before dusk. Poetry is a tattered rug on hardwood, softening the ground on which we tread. Poetry is play. Is language. Is human. In this Introduction to Poetry class, we will be delving into all things poetry. We will think equally as critically about assigned readings as we do our own and our peers' work. We will read and discuss poems and/or collections by Barbara Jane Reyes, Franny Choi, Peter Twal, Karyna McGlynn, and more, to help us understand what poetry is and what it can be. What is poetry to you? Let’s get lost in the process of discovery.

 

ENGL 20002
Introduction to Poetry Writing
Jahan Khajavipour
TR 3:30-4:45
Section 04 - Seniors
Section 05 - Unallocated
Section 06 - Freshmen

This introductory creative writing course will focus on techniques for writing poetry with approaches to form, genres, media, language, & performance. Students will sharpen their critical vocabulary as they analyze assigned readings, critique peer work, and receive critiques of their poems from both peers and instructor.

 

ENGL 20002
Introduction to Poetry Writing
Scarlett Wardrop
TR 9:30-10:45
Section 07 - Seniors 
Section 08 - Unallocated 
Section 09 - Freshmen

"So be it, I said, poetry is an ice palace. There the Snow Queen lives with her kidnapped child. The little boy puts together a puzzle made of ice shards, which are also the letters, the blind alphabet, of Desire. She promises to set him free if he pieces together the word eternity" (María Negroni, translated by Michelle Gil-Montero, The Annunciation). In this Introduction to Poetry Writing class, we will learn how to put the puzzle of ice shards together to make poetry. We will discuss poetic elements, including scenes, figurative language, form, language, and more. We will also learn about the different mediums poetry can take including visual forms, performance, experiment, and digital media. We will discuss works by Chelsey Minnis, Christian Bök, Marosa di Giorgio, Natalie Diaz, Georg Trakl and more to learn about how these poets approach such poetic elements in their writing, as well as what we might like to implement in our own creative work. Students will work toward building a collection of poems over the course of the semester that will culminate in a final portfolio.

 

ENGL 20024
Creative Writing and Multiculturalism
Sade Murphy
MW 3:30-4:45
Sec 01 - Seniors
Sec 02 - Unallocated
Sec 03 - Freshmen

What does multicultural writing look like in America? Who is writing it, how are they doing so, and why? During this semester, we will engage with these questions both as readers and writers through the study of a variety of texts, as well as create our own texts to add to this tradition. We will analyze fiction (novel and short story length), poetry, graphic novel, memoir, personal essay, play, film, television and oral storytelling and mine them for both understanding and methodology. Through the study and practice of these media, we will begin to formulate our own writing projects and figure out how we fit into the multicultural literary tradition. This class will require students to turn in both academic responses and creative writing.

 

ENGL 30851
Poetry Writing
Orlando Menes
TR 11:00-12:15

This is a course for students who are ready to immerse themselves in the strange contagious waters of poetry. We’ll read across regions, languages, communities and time periods to connect to poetry’s aesthetic, formal, and political urgencies and possibilities, and we’ll write an array of poems of our own. Expect to write individual lyrics as well as prose poems, letters, verse plays, sound poems, collages, remixes, performance pieces, and verse plays, and to poke around in the traditional and digital media by which poems have been shared. I’ll expect you to write in- and out- of class poems, work collaboratively on group projects and translations, present, perform, participate, offer kind supportive feedback on peer work, and propose and execute a final project of your own devising. Attendance is mandatory.

 

ENGL 30853
Fiction Writing
Jake Schepers
MW 11:00-12:15

This course will give us a chance to “look under the hood” of storytelling and the writing of fiction. We will read a diverse array of contemporary writers and discuss a wide range of techniques and considerations that characterize fiction in order to develop both our own writing and our individual aesthetic interests, ideas, and styles. As an introduction to fiction writing, no prior knowledge of or experience with craft, tradition, or texts is necessary. What will be required is engaged participation, robust discussion, and weekly writing exercises, as well as two larger projects consisting of an essay about the state of fiction and a story portfolio consisting of four substantially revised short stories which will be due by semester’s end.

 

ENGL 40850
Advanced Fiction Writing 
Joyelle McSweeney
MW 3:30-4:45 

In this course, students will generate, draft, and revise their own prose-projects-in-progress; lead workshops of their own drafts; and contribute generously to workshops of peer projects. To expand our sense of possibility, we’ll read works of modern and contemporary literature and contemplate some of the ‘stranger forms’ of prose writing; to expand our technical skills, we’ll try our hands at one or more of these stranger forms, such as  translation, adaptation, ghost story, haunted house, lyric essay, pataphysics, style-driven writing, craft essay, prose-poem sequence, etc. 


 

ENGL 40852
Advanced Fiction Writing II
Joyelle McSweeney
MW 3:30-4:45

This course is intended for students who have already taken an Advanced Fiction Writing and who are seriously interested in writing fiction. In this course, students will generate, draft, and revise their own prose-projects-in-progress; lead workshops of their own drafts; and contribute generously to workshops of peer projects. To expand our sense of possibility, we’ll read works of modern and contemporary literature and contemplate some of the ‘stranger forms’ of prose writing; to expand our technical skills, we’ll try our hands at one or more of these stranger forms, such as  translation, adaptation, ghost story, haunted house, lyric essay, pataphysics, style-driven writing, craft essay, prose-poem sequence, etc. 

 

ENGL 40855
Advanced Fiction Writing III
Joyelle McSweeney
MW 3:30-4:45

This course is intended for students who have already taken an Advanced Fiction Writing and who are seriously interested in writing fiction. In this course, students will generate, draft, and revise their own prose-projects-in-progress; lead workshops of their own drafts; and contribute generously to workshops of peer projects. To expand our sense of possibility, we’ll read works of modern and contemporary literature and contemplate some of the ‘stranger forms’ of prose writing; to expand our technical skills, we’ll try our hands at one or more of these stranger forms, such as  translation, adaptation, ghost story, haunted house, lyric essay, pataphysics, style-driven writing, craft essay, prose-poem sequence, etc.