Jessica Kim

Email: Jessica.K.Kim.308@nd.edu

Areas of Interest

British, Irish, and Anglophone modernism, postcolonial literature and theory, feminist and queer theory, psychoanalysis, the abject, the novel, race and transnational studies.

Education

Yale University, B.A. English

Profile

Jessica Kim is a third-year Ph.D. student in the Department of English and a Presidential Fellow at the University of Notre Dame. Her research interests lie in British, Irish, and Anglophone modernism, the novel, feminist and queer theory, psychoanalysis, and postcolonial theory. She is specifically interested in interrogating confluences between gendered and postcolonial approaches to cosmopolitanism, minority, and racial difference, as well as the development of a radical aesthetics related to the representation of abject identities, in British, Irish, and transnational modernist fiction. More broadly, she is also interested in investigating formal and political relationships between British modernist and postcolonial writing.

Recent Scholarly Activity:

Kim, Jessica, “A Carnival of the Grotesque: Feminine Imperial Flânerie in Virginia Woolf’s ‘Street Haunting’ and Una Marson’s ‘Little Brown Girl.’” Virginia Woolf and Her Female Contemporaries: Selected Papers from the Twenty-Fifth Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf. Clemson, SC: Clemson University Digital Press, forthcoming 2016.

Kim, Jessica, “Fits of Queerness: Hegemonic Discourse, Anti-Sociality, and the Death Drive in J .M. Synge’s The Playboy of the Western World and Riders to the Sea and Derek Walcott’s The Sea at Dauphin.” American Conference for Irish Studies. University of Notre Dame, March 2016. Paper presentation.

Kim, Jessica, “A Time for Lyric: Lyric Transversals of Historic Time in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land.” University of Notre Dame English Department Graduate Research Symposium. February 2016. Paper presentation.

Kim, Jessica, “A Carnival of the Grotesque: Feminine Imperial Flânerie in Virginia Woolf’s ‘Street Haunting’ and Una Marson’s ‘Little Brown Girl.’” The 25th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf. Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, June 2015. Paper presentation.

Kim, Jessica, “Spectacles of Familiarity: The Domestic Grotesque and Imperial Flânerie in Virginia Woolf’s ‘Street Haunting.’” The Space Between: Literature and Culture, 1914-1945 Conference. University of Notre Dame, June 2015. Paper presentation.