Gerald Bruns

Jerry Bruns

Gerald L. Bruns is the William P. & Hazel B. White Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Notre Dame. His first book, Modern Poetry and the Idea of Language, was published by Yale University Press in 1974. He then turned his attention to the history of interpretation and the development of philosophical hermeneutics, an interest that resulted in two books, Inventions: Writing, Textuality, and Understanding in Literary History (Yale, 1982) and Hermeneutics Ancient and Modern (Yale, 1992). Along the way he has also written books on Martin Heidegger and Maurice Blanchot. Tragic Thoughts at the End of Philosophy: Language, Literature, and Ethical Theory appeared from Northwestern University Press in 1999. His most recent book is What Are Poets For? An Anthropology of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics (University of Iowa Press, 2012). Other recent books include On Ceasing to be Human (Stanford University Press, 2010), On the Anarchy of Poetry and Philosophy (Fordham University Press, 2006), and The Material of Poetry: Sketches for a Philosophical Poetics (University of Georgia Press, 2005). He received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1974 and again in 1985. He has been a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study at Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1985-86), the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford (1993-94) and the Stanford Humanities Center (2007-2008). In 2008 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He now lives in Evanston, Illinois. 

Contact information
gbruns@nd.edu

CV for Gerald Bruns 11/2013

On Ceasing to be Human (2010)

On the Anarchy of Poetry and Philosophy: A Guide for the Unruly (2006)

Tragic Thoughts at the End of Philosophy: Language, Literature, and Ethical Theory (1999)

Heidegger’s Estrangements: Language, Truth, and Poetry in the Later Writings (1989)

Inventions: Writing, Textuality, and Understanding in Literary History (1982)