News

Stephen Fredman Awarded $125,000 for Acquisition of Robert Creeley Library

Author: Karrie Fuller

Shortly after co-editing a book titled Form, Power, and Person in Robert Creeley’s Life and Work, the English department’s Stephen Fredman has been awarded a $125,000 Library Acquisition Grant from the Office of the Provost to support the library’s purchase of the late poet Robert Creeley’s library. This grant will contribute to the $684,000 cost of the collection, $80,000 of which Creeley’s widow donated to aid the acquisition and restoration of Creeley’s library. …

Read More

Notre Dame Partners with Poetry Society of America for National Series

Author: Andrew Deliyannides

Letras Latinas, the literary program of the University of Notre Dame’s Institute for Latino Studies (ILS), is partnering with the Poetry Society of America (PSA) to present “Latino/a Poetry Now,” a national tour that will showcase 15 poets in a span of two-and-a-half years. The joint initiative will open Tuesday, November 8 at Harvard University and conclude at Notre Dame Oct. 29–30, 2013.

Read More

Shakespeare a “fakespeare?” Notre Dame expert says idea “pitifully silly”

Author: Liquid error: undefined method `[]' for nil:NilClass

 

Is the Bard a fraud? Is someone other than William Shakespeare the true author of the some of the most revered works of English literature, as the upcoming movie “Anonymous” suggests?

“Absolutely not,” according to University of Notre Dame Shakespeare expert Peter Holland, the McMeel Family Chair in Shakespeare Studies and Associate Dean for the Arts.

Read More

Declan Kiberd Appointed as the Donald and Marilyn Keough Professor of Irish Studies and Professor of English

Author: Karrie Fuller

The commencement of the 2011-2012 school year brought with it the joint appointment of world-leading scholar Declan Kiberd to the department of English and the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies. Professor Kiberd, who will teach at Notre Dame during the fall semesters and in the Irish Institute’s Dublin center during the spring and summer, specializes in modern Irish literature and culture with an emphasis on postcolonial theory. He is known for his many books on the subject, including Inventing Ireland: Literature of the Modern Nation

Read More

Special Issue of Disability Studies Quarterly Co-edited by John Duffy

Author: Karrie Fuller

John Duffy, associate professor in the English department and the Francis O’Malley Director of the University Writing Program, has recently co-edited the latest issue of Disability Studies Quarterly with Melanie Yergeau of the University of Michigan. This special issue entitled “Disability and Rhetoric” promotes new methodological possibilities for applying rhetorical approaches to the burgeoning study of disability. The issue’s goal––to raise questions about the relationship between rhetoric and disability––emphasizes how our conceptions of disability emerge out of a culturally and socially constructed set of symbols and narratives.…

Read More

Creative Writing Program Alumna Wins Poetry Prize

Author: Mary Hendriksen

Susan Blackwell Ramsey, a 2008 graduate of the University of Notre Dame’s M.F.A. in Creative Writing Program, is the winner of the Prairie Schooner Book Prize in Poetry for 2011. She will receive a $3,000 prize and publication of her manuscript, A Mind Like This, by the University of Nebraska Press.

Read More

Newest Book by Prof. Gerald Bruns

Author: Steve Tomasula

Gerald L. Bruns, William P. & Hazel B. White Professor Emeritus of English, taught at Notre Dame from 1984 to 2008. In “retirement” he has recently published several studies, including, On Ceasing to Be Human (Stanford University Press, 2011), of which Professor Steve Tomasula writes:

The genius of Gerald L. Bruns has always been his ability to ask exactly right questions about exactly right subjects to reveal why people write literature, how we read, and what the literature of the past can tell us about the world outside the book at our contemporary moment. When the very idea of meaning was under question, Bruns gave us Inventions: Writing, Textuality, and Understanding in Literary History

Read More

Stuart Greene Honored for Civic Engagement

Author: William Schmitt

Campus Compact, a coalition of more than 1,100 college and university presidents, has named Stuart Greene, an Institute for Educational Initiatives fellow and director of the Education, Schooling, and Society (ESS) program at the University of Notre Dame, one of four finalists for the 2011 Thomas Ehrlich Civically Engaged Faculty Award.

Read More

Stephen Fredman Publishes Two Books

Author: Gustafson, Sandra

Stephen Fredman had a year worth celebrating in 2010.  He published two books:  a cultural history of mid-twentieth century American poetry and the arts entitled Contextual Practice: Assemblage and the Erotic in Postwar Poetry and Art; and a collection on the poet Robert Creeley, Form, Power, and Person in Robert Creeley’s Life and Work, which he edited with Steve McCaffery.

Read More

New Faculty Strengthen American Literary Studies at Notre Dame

Author: Kate Cohorst

Laura Dassow Walls, a distinguished scholar of 19th century American literature and culture, will join the Notre Dame faculty in fall 2011 as the William P. and Hazel B. White Professor of English. Her arrival, notes Professor John Sitter, chair of the Department of English, is the latest in a series of recent hires that have been critical to the growth of the department.

Read More

English Majors Thrive in Diverse Careers

Author: Kate Cohorst

You can find Notre Dame graduates with degrees in English almost everywhere—and not just working in the classroom as teachers or professors. Indeed, according to a survey of alumni, they are thriving in a broad range of professions. Consider, as just one example, the members of a virtual departmental dynasty: brothers Greg ’87, Jeff ’89, and Mark Miller ’05. All three received English degrees before moving into careers that include finance, medicine, publishing, and higher education.

Read More

Love of Appalachian Literature Inspires Student Research

Author: Kate Cohorst

Pride in his cultural heritage and a love of literature prompted senior English major Matthew Coyne to delve into the origins of the Appalachian literary journal Cold Mountain Review last summera research project he then expanded into a senior thesis on influential regional writers.

Read More

Author Steve Tomasula Explores Art’s Frontier

Author: Kate Cohorst

To Steve Tomasula, literature is the “wild west” of the arts today. “As an artistic medium, the revolution that’s gone through music and the visual arts is now happening in books,” said Tomasula, an associate professor in the Notre Dame Department of English and director of its Creative Writing Program.

Read More

English Faculty Win Prestigious Honors

Author: Kate Cohorst

Three English professors at the University of Notre Dame—Stephen M. Fallon, Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, and Peter Holland—have been singled out for their outstanding scholarship. “Any of the three major honors accorded to these professors would alone be welcome news for Notre Dame—together they signal the highest distinction,” says Professor John Sitter, chair of the Department of English.

Read More

ACLS Honors Three Notre Dame English Scholars

Author: Kate Cohorst

Women in the Department of English accounted for three of the four American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) fellowships the University of Notre Dame received in 2010. The recipients include John Cardinal O’Hara, C.S.C., Associate Professor of EnglishSusannah Monta, Assistant Professor Katherine Zieman and Ph.D. candidate Hilary Fox.

Read More

Student Spotlight: Ryan Downey and Sami Schalk: MFA in Creative Writing, May 2010

Author: Lynn McCormack

To some observers and critics, there is a stark divide between Notre Dame and the communities in the South Bend area. Two recent graduates of the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Program worked diligently for their two-year tenure at Notre Dame to bridge those worlds, bringing Notre Dame into South Bend’s underprivileged communities, and poignantly likewise, those communities into Notre Dame.

Read More