News

In memoriam: James H. Walton, professor emeritus of English

Author: Michael O. Garvey

James H. Walton

James H. Walton, professor emeritus of English at the University of Notre Dame, died Saturday after a brief illness. He was 74 years old.

A native of Blue Island, Ill., Walton was graduated from Notre Dame in 1959 and earned master’s and doctoral degrees in English from Northwestern University in 1960 and 1963, respectively.

He joined the Notre Dame faculty in 1963, teaching popular courses on the English novel and 18th-century literature until his retirement in 2003. A few years earlier, he had jokingly summarized his career at Notre Dame with what he called “painful brevity: I’ve taught British fiction from Defoe to Joyce for 25 years without once being solicited by ‘Who’s Who.’”

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English Professor Kathryn Kerby-Fulton Receives NEH Grant

Author: Joanna Basile

Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, professor and Notre Dame Chair in English, has been awarded a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) for her book project titled Professional Reading Circles, the Clerical Proletariat, and the Rise of English Literature. She was also recently elected as a fellow in the Medieval Academy of America.

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Ph.D. Alumnus Explores the Political Through Art

Author: Aaron Smith

 

Literature courses are practices in close reading, but one class at Occidental College is equally an exercise in active listening. Taught by postdoctoral fellow James Ford III, who received his Ph.D. in English from Notre Dame in 2009, the course explores the aesthetic and philosophical evolution of the music genre known as hip hop. Ford, who will join the Occidental faculty this fall as an assistant professor of English and comparative literature studies, also teaches an advanced course called Black Reconstruction: Reading Radicalism in African American Literature.

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English Majors Delve Into Senior Thesis Projects

Author: Joanna Basile

English and anthropology major Caitlin Wilson traveled down the rabbit hole for her senior thesis, which examines the connection between Victorian children’s literature and ethnography, or the anthropological study of customs and cultures.

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Recent Books From Our Faculty

Author: Arts & Letters

The Dispossessed State: Narratives of Ownership in Nineteenth-Century Britain and Ireland

The Dispossessed State: Narratives of Ownership in 19th-Century Britain and Ireland

 

Sara Maurer

Assistant Professor

Maurer connects the Victorian novel’s preoccupation with the landed estate to 19th century debates about property, specifically as it played out in the English occupation of Ireland. By focusing on the ownership of land, The Dispossessed State

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Hybrid Irelands Conference at Notre Dame, March 29-31

Author: Karrie Fuller

The weekend of March 29-31, 2012 promises to be an exciting one for students and faculty interested in Irish Studies at Notre Dame. “Hybrid Irelands: At Culture’s Edge,” a conference organized by John Dillon and Nathaniel Meyers, will take place at the Notre Dame Conference Center with plenary lectures by Terry Eagleton (University of Notre Dame), Clair Wills (Queen Mary, University of London), and David Lloyd (University of Southern California). All panels and lectures are open for Notre Dame Students to attend, and the schedule can be accessed at the conference’s website: http://hybridie.nd.edu

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Creative Writing MFA Student Betsy Cornwell Signs Book Deal

Author: Joanna Basile

Betsy Cornwell, a master’s student in Notre Dame’s Creative Writing Program, has sold her first two novels to Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Both books, written for a young adult audience, have their roots in the science fiction and fantasy genres.

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The Novel That Changed America: Celebrating Ralph Ellison's 'Invisible Man'

Author: Liquid error: internal

 

The acclaimed novel “Invisible Man” by Ralph Ellison (1914-1994) holds a prominent place in the annals of both American literature and American history. Its release in March 1952 helped catalyze the civil rights movement in this country, and generations of students have been moved by the novel’s rich portrayal of social conflict and the poignant life of its unnamed narrator.

In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the release of the book, as well as the author’s March 1 birthday, the University of Notre Dame’s Department of English is sponsoring a public reading of selections of the great novel from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday (March 1) in the Great Hall of O’Shaughnessy Hall, where faculty and students will read.

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Mark Brazaitis wins 2012 Sullivan Prize

Author: Coleen Hoover

 

Mark Brazaitis is the winner of the University of Notre Dame’s 2012 Sullivan Prize for his collection of stories, “The Incurables.”

The Sullivan Prize, which began in 1996, is awarded biennially to an author who has already published at least one volume of short fiction. The winner receives a thousand dollars and publication by the University of Notre Dame Press.

Valerie Sayers and William O’Rourke, both professors of English and former directors of Notre Dame’s Creative Writing Program, were the judges. O’Rourke commented that this year, “Once again, the difficulty in judging was extreme; we had to contend with an excess of riches, but Brazaitis’ collection stood out amongst the many worthy (manuscripts) we had to consider.”

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Alumna Reports From the Heart of the Vatican

Author: By Andrew Vanden Bossche

Elizabeth Simari ’08, crosses Saint Peter’s Square on the way to and from work, shops at the Vatican’s grocery store, and has even had the Pope drop by her office. “It’s an amazing experience,” says Simari, who majored in Italian and English at Notre Dame and now works for the weekly English edition of the Vatican newspaper, L’Osservatore Romano. “I feel blessed to have these once-in-a-lifetime opportunities.”

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Volumes of Poet Robert Creeley Added to Notre Dame Special Collections

Author: Liquid error: internal

 

Renowned poet Robert Creeley (1926-2005) was a master bookshelf builder, driven by a need to keep his beloved books “safe, sorted and out of harm’s way,” says his widow, Penelope Creeley. Thanks to a Library Acquisition Grant from the University of Notre Dame’s Office of the Provost, some 200 volumes of the late poet’s works are now safely tucked away in the special collections section of Notre Dame’s Hesburgh Libraries, with hundreds more to follow.

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College Welcomes Two New Moreau Fellows

Author: Karla Cruise

Hip-hop and boxing are not just entertainment for Notre Dame’s two new Moreau Academic Diversity Postdoctoral Fellows, Brian Su-Jen Chung and Jesse Costantino; they’re fertile ground for academic research. Chung, in the American studies department, and Costantino, in English, joined the College of Arts and Letters in fall 2011 as part of a University effort to enhance cultural awareness and diversity within the campus community.

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Notre Dame Among Top Producers of Fulbrights

Author: Arts and Letters

University of Notre Dame students were awarded 13 Fulbright grants for the 2011-12 academic year, placing the University among the top universities in the nation. Eleven of the 13 are from the College of Arts and Letters. The U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program, Fulbright recently announced the complete list of colleges and universities that produced the most 2011-2012 U.S. Fulbright students.

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Margaret Doody Lectures on the Novel in China

Author: Karrie Fuller

October brought with it the experience of a lifetime for Margaret Doody, the John and Barbara Glynn Family Professor of Literature and the first Director of the Ph.D. in Literature Program, who spent the better part of the month in Singapore and China delivering lectures about the novel, women novelists, and the Enlightenment. Her trip began with a week long visit at Nanyang Technical University in Singapore followed by two weeks in China where she lectured at Beihang University and Peking University in Beijing. Professor Doody is  best known in China for her monograph The True Story of the Novel

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Notre Dame Theater Performance Explores Disability

Author: Chris Milazzo

Electronic music roars and pulsates throughout the theatre. On stage, a blind man paces, struggling to escape the ring of steel bars that confine him. Meanwhile, a stern figure in a sleek suit and sunglasses stands guard. When the lights dim and dialogue begins to flash above the stage from an overhead projector, one thing is clear: This production of John Milton’s Samson Agonistes is far from ordinary.

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English Doctoral Candidate Receives Dissertation Fellowship

Author: Joanna Basile

Lauren Rich, a Ph.D. candidate in Notre Dame’s Department of English, has been awarded a 2011–12 American Dissertation Fellowship from the American Association of University Women for her research on food in early 20th century British and colonial fiction. Fewer than 10 percent of the more than 900 applicants were given fellowships.

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Stephen Fredman Awarded $125,000 for Acquisition of Robert Creeley Library

Author: Karrie Fuller

Shortly after co-editing a book titled Form, Power, and Person in Robert Creeley’s Life and Work, the English department’s Stephen Fredman has been awarded a $125,000 Library Acquisition Grant from the Office of the Provost to support the library’s purchase of the late poet Robert Creeley’s library. This grant will contribute to the $684,000 cost of the collection, $80,000 of which Creeley’s widow donated to aid the acquisition and restoration of Creeley’s library. …

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Notre Dame Partners with Poetry Society of America for National Series

Author: Andrew Deliyannides

Letras Latinas, the literary program of the University of Notre Dame’s Institute for Latino Studies (ILS), is partnering with the Poetry Society of America (PSA) to present “Latino/a Poetry Now,” a national tour that will showcase 15 poets in a span of two-and-a-half years. The joint initiative will open Tuesday, November 8 at Harvard University and conclude at Notre Dame Oct. 29–30, 2013.

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Shakespeare a “fakespeare?” Notre Dame expert says idea “pitifully silly”

Author: Liquid error: internal

 

Is the Bard a fraud? Is someone other than William Shakespeare the true author of the some of the most revered works of English literature, as the upcoming movie “Anonymous” suggests?

“Absolutely not,” according to University of Notre Dame Shakespeare expert Peter Holland, the McMeel Family Chair in Shakespeare Studies and Associate Dean for the Arts.

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