Notre Dame, Holy Cross Lead Transformational Liberal Arts Education Program at Indiana Prison

Author: Josh Weinhold

WEI

Driven by a commitment to Catholic social teaching and a strong belief that a liberal arts education can transform lives, Notre Dame and Holy Cross College faculty are teaching college-level courses for inmates at Indiana’s Westville Correction Facility. Since 2013, nearly 100 inmates have earned college credit and 11 have earned associate degrees as of this month. But developing a strong foundation in reading, writing, research, public speaking, and critical thinking offers benefits that go far beyond the professional opportunities a degree might one day provide.

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Shamrock Series Academic Events to Tackle Irish History, Research on Poverty

Author: Josh Weinhold

Shamrock Series 2015

A football game isn’t the only thing Notre Dame is bringing to Boston in late November. As part of a weekend of events surrounding the Shamrock Series, Notre Dame’s annual home-away-from-home football game, the College of Arts and Letters will host a pair of academic conversations the day before the Fighting Irish face Boston College at Fenway Park. Notre Dame historians will offer an interdisciplinary look at the impact of Irish immigration on American religious and political structures, as well as the role of the U.S. in the 1916 Easter Rising, while economists will discuss research initiatives that aim to change the way humanitarian services help the poor both domestically and abroad.

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Scholar of African American Literature to Join Department of English

Author: Josh Weinhold

Jarvis McInnis icon

Jarvis C. McInnis, a scholar whose research blends African American and African diaspora literature with music and visual culture, will join Notre Dame’s Department of English as an assistant professor in fall 2016. In studying what he has deemed the “global black South,” McInnis examines the looming sociopolitical and cultural presence of the plantation in the U.S. South and the Caribbean in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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