Upcoming Events By Month

« March 2017 »

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

MFA 1st & 2nd Years Reading

-

Location: Andrews Auditorium, Geddes Hall

Thomson Guster, Erik-John Fuhrer, Ingabirano Nintunze, and Grace Polleys.

Erik-John Fuhrer dominates the blank space with sickness and nightmares that morph into animals. Slanderous, his dog says.

Thomson Guster is a fiction writer, or he might be fiction, or he might be a clone of a fiction writer. We aren’t sure yet.…

Read More

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Gregory Howard Reading

-

Location: Hammes Campus Bookstore

Howard

Gregory Howard will read Wednesday, March 8, 2017, at Hammes Campus Bookstore on Notre Dame. The reading begins at 7 PM. It is free and open to the public.

Gregory Howard teaches creative writing, contemporary literature, and film studies at the University of Maine. His first novel Hospice

Read More

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Barry Lopez Lecture, "The Writer and Social Responsibility"

-

Location: 101 Jordan Hall of Science

Blopez

Barry Lopez was born in 1945 in Port Chester, New York. He grew up in Southern California and New York City and attended college in the Midwest before moving to Oregon, where he has lived since 1968. He is an essayist, author, and short-story writer, and has traveled extensively in remote and populated parts of the world.

Read More

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Hilary Plum & Zach Savich Reading

-

Location: Hammes Campus Bookstore

Savich Plum

Hilary Plum is the author of the work of nonfiction Watchfires (Rescue Press, 2016) and the novel They Dragged Them Through the Streets (FC2, 2013). Recent prose and criticism has appeared in Full StopBookforum, the Seneca ReviewPoetry Northwest, the Massachusetts Review

Read More

Friday, March 24, 2017

American Area Seminar: Jarvis McInnis

-

Location: 106 O'Shaughnessy Hall

The year's final meeting of the American Area Seminar, will be held Friday,  March 24, from 12:15-1:45 in 106 O'Shaughnessy Hall. Jarvis McInnis will be speaking on "Plantation Futures: Marcus Garvey, Booker T. Washington, and the Literary Economies of the Global Black South."

While it is well known that Marcus Garvey was committed to the industrial and commercial development of the black world, scholars have paid less attention to the significance of agriculture, and particularly the plantation, within his project. Inspired by Booker T. Washington’s uplift philosophy and the United Fruit Company’s vast fruit plantations, Garvey envisioned linking black-owned plantations in the Caribbean and Africa with factories in the US as the basis for establishing a global black cooperative. Drawing on scholarship in Caribbean Studies that establishes the plantation as a site of domination on the one hand, and the genesis of black modernity on the other, this paper will explore what it means that Garvey imagined a black agrarian and industrial future that left the plantation intact.…

Read More

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

1st Year MFA Candidates' Reading

-

Location: Andrews Auditorium, Geddes Hall

Abigail Burns pursues punching prose profusely perpetuating powerful people.           

Madison McCartha finds the insidious in the whimsical, a voice that is jeering yet insecure, the duplicity of the bully and the trickster.

Daniel Tharp’s prose has been described as sociopathic, yet realistic. Its good authorial intent is never considered by scholars.…

Read More