Upcoming Events By Year

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Thursday, January 14, 2016

SENS: Julia Douthwaite

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Location: 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall

The next meeting of the Seminar in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-century Studies (SENS) will take place Thursday, January 14, at 5:00 pm in 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall. Julia Douthwaite of the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures will speak on "How Revolutionary Is Our Scholarship?" A reception will follow.…

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Friday, January 29, 2016

Felski Reception & Book Signing

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Location: Eck Visitors Center Lobby

felksi_poster

The English Department cordially invites you to an open reception and book signing with Rita Felski Friday, January 29, in the Eck Visitors Center lobby from 2:00 to 3:30 pm. This event celebrates Professor Felski's long-awaited book The Limits of Critique

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Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Roy Scranton

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Location: Morris Inn, Carmichael Room

Roy Scranton reads on February 2, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. in the Morris Inn, Carmichael Room.

Roy Scranton is the author of Learning to Die in the Anthropocene: Reflections on the End of a Civilization (City Lights, 2015), and co-editor of Fire and Forget: Short Stories from the Long War (Da Capo, 2013). His journalism, essays, criticism, and fiction have been published in The Nation, Rolling Stone, the New York Times, Contemporary Literature, The Appendix, LIT, Theory & Event, and elsewhere. He holds an MA in Liberal Studies from the New School for Social Research and a PhD in English from Princeton. He is currently a post-doctoral research fellow at the Center for Energy and Environmental Research in the Human Sciences at Rice University. His novel, War Porn, will be published this fall from Soho Press. He is currently working on a book about the politics of trauma in American World War II literature.…

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Wednesday, February 3, 2016

SENS: Katie Osborn

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Location: 117 O'Shaughnessy Hall

The next meeting of the Seminar in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-century Studies (SENS) will take place Wednesday, February 3, at 5:00 pm in 117 O'Shaughnessy Hall. Katie Osborn will speak on "Introspection, Experience, and the 'Rhetoric of Fallenness' in Mary Barton." A reception will follow.

SENS provides a regular gathering point for the Notre Dame interdisciplinary community of faculty and graduate students engaged with this area of studies.  Seminars include lectures, workshops, works-in-progress, and much conversation by Notre Dame faculty and graduate students. Each semester's schedule includes external speakers, with the Fall 2015 line-up featuring James Chandler from the University of Chicago and Josephine McDonagh from King's College, London.…

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MFAs Reading

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Location: Great Hall of O'Shaughnessy

Luis Lopez-Maldonado marries poetry, theatre, and dance to create fresh and provocative art dealing with race, displacement, gender, sex, feminism, terrorism, externalism, and masculinity and everything in-between.

Tania Sarfraz writes short prose that meanders, finds its way. Or stays lost, it's all the same. She grew up in Lahore, Pakistan.…

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Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Undergraduate Reading I

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Location: Breen Phillips Hall Bsmt

The Undergraduate Reading Series was founded in the fall semester of 2015 by senior McKenzie Hightower to connect undergraduate students to both the creative writing program and the broader community. For some, it is their first opportunity to share their work aloud with an audience and the Series is intended to instill confidence in the work of Notre Dame undergraduate creative writers.

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Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Reading: Paul Cunningham

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Location: Hammes Bookstore

goaltender

Paul Cunningham will read Wednesday, February 10, 2016 at the Hammes Bookstore on Notre Dame’s campus.The reading begins at 7:30 p.m.

Paul Cunningham (b. 1989) founded Radioactive Moat Press in 2009 and he manages an online journal called Deluge. He is a former assistant editor of Action Books, a managing editor of Action, Yes

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Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Martin Ott

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Location: Hammes Bookstore

Martin Ott reads on February 17, 2016 at 7:30 PM in the Hammes bookstore.

In Underdays, Martin Ott writes a book about love and war in poems that represent different eras, voices, and influences. This is a journey that combines the author’s new work, old work reimagined, and multiple voices (internal and external) in a conversation with his older and younger selves – his Underdays – to chart a path forward. The author combines global concerns alongside personal ones, in conversation between poems or within them, to find meaning in his search for what drives us to love and hate each other.…

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Thursday, February 25, 2016

Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar: Hazel Carby

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Location: Jordan Auditorium: Mendoza College of Business

hazel_carby

The English Department cordially invites you to a lecture by Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Hazel Carby of Yale University. Professor Carby will speak on "Black Futurities: Shape-shifting beyond the Limits of the Human” at 5:00 pm Thursday, February 25, in the Jordan Auditorium, Mendoza College of Business. A reception will follow.…

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Wednesday, March 2, 2016

SENS: Essaka Joshua

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Location: 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall

The next meeting of the Seminar in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-century Studies (SENS) will take place on Wednesday, March 2, at 5:00 pm in 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall. Essaka Joshua will speak on "Picturesque Aesthetics: Theorizing Deformity in the Romantic Era." A reception will follow.

SENS provides a regular gathering point for the Notre Dame interdisciplinary community of faculty and graduate students engaged with this area of studies.  Seminars include lectures, workshops, works-in-progress, and much conversation by Notre Dame faculty and graduate students. Each semester's schedule includes external speakers, with the Fall 2015 line-up featuring James Chandler from the University of Chicago and Josephine McDonagh from King's College, London.…

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MFA Reading

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Location: Geddes Hall Cafe

Zack Anderson's poems drizzle investigations of masculinity, pop culture, and embodied being with a syrupy glaze of dark snark and paralytic pessimism.

Chris Muravez heretically writes about War and Apocalypse with the audacity of fire and brimstone.

Sarah Snider’s work explores various types of fiction, creative nonfiction, memoir, and personal essay, at times blending all styles together…

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Thursday, March 3, 2016

2016 English Department Graduate Research Symposium

Location: 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall

The Department of English and the English Graduate Student Association is proud to announce the Second Annual Graduate Research Symposium, which will take place Thursday, March 3, and Friday, March 4. The symposium will feature an exciting lineup of graduates from different years, periods, and fields presenting their current research in nine panels spread out over the two days. Click here to download the program.

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Friday, March 18, 2016

Lecture: Steven Mullaney

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Location: 320 Malloy Hall

Please mark your calendars for the following special lecture, sponsored by the Early Modern Group: “The Politics of Attention in Shakespearean Tragedy” by Professor Steven Mullaney of the University of Michigan. Professor Mullaney is the author of The Reformation of Emotions in the Age of Shakespeare 

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Wednesday, March 23, 2016

TOXI*CITY

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Location: DPAC

rettbergcoover

TOXI-City will be shown on March 23, 2016 in DPAC.

TOXI-City is a combinatory narrative film by Roderick Coover and Scott Rettberg. The project imagines life in the Delaware River Estuary in a near future environment impacted by hurricanes, flooding, and widespread seepage of toxic chemicals in major population centers. The film asks what would happen if climate change resulted in storms and changes to our waterways that resulted in the release of the many poisonous substances from Superfund sites and abandoned factories in the area into Philadelphia and New Jersey. Characters describe a struggle to conduct everyday life in a world transformed by environmental devastation and society's reaction to it. The fictional narrative fragments recombine with a chorus of contemporary voices describing factual deaths caused by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. The imagery based on original footage - most shot from a kayak - of the industrial docklands that stretch from Wilmington to Trenton to include the cities and environs of Chester, Philadelphia, and Camden.…

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Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Americanist Seminar: Michael Trask

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Location: 210 Debartolo Hall

Professor Trask will be giving a lecture that gives us new ways to understand the politics of cults in the 1970s and, in their uptake in the fictions of William S. Burroughs and Robert Coover, new ways to understand their place in twentieth century American literature.

Michael Trask is Guy M. Davenport professor of English at the University of Kentucky where he writes and teaches on twentieth- and twenty-first century American literature and culture, Queer Theory, and Feminism. His latest book, Camp Sites: Sex, Politics, and Academic Style in Postwar Culture

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Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Kim Yideum

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Location: Hammes Campus Bookstore

yideummug

Kim Yideum has published five books of poetry—A Stain in the Shape of a Star (2005), Cheer Up, Femme Fatale (2007), The Unspeakable Lover (2011), Song of Berlin, Dahlem (2013), and Hysteria (2014). Her work has been adapted into a play (The Metamorphosis, 2014) and a film (After School

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Wednesday, April 20, 2016

MFA Thesis Reading

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Location: Regis Philbin Studio Theatre

thesisreading2016_legal

Second year students of the Masters of Fine Arts in Creative Writing at the University of Notre Dame will be reading from their final theses at the Regis Philbin Studio Theater in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center on April 20th, 2016 at 7:00 p.m.

This event is free, but you will need a ticket to attend. You can get your ticket at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.…

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Thursday, April 21, 2016

2016 Duffy Lecture: Virginia Jackson

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Location: Oak Room - South Dining Hall

Virginia Jackson

The English Department is pleased to announce that our 2016 Joseph M. Duffy Lecturer is Virginia Jackson of the University of California, Irvine. Professor Jackson's lecture, "American Poetry in Public," will take place at 5:00 pm in the Oak Room of the South Dining Hall. A reception will follow.…

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Friday, April 29, 2016

Creative Writing Honors Concentrators & Concentrators Reading

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Location: Hammes Campus Bookstore

Reading at Notre Dame by graduating Creative Writing Honors Concentrators and Concentrators.

Graduating students of the undergraduate Creative Writing Honors Concentration & Concentrators at the University of Notre Dame will be reading from their final theses at the Hammes Bookstore on April 29th, 2016 at 3:30 p.m.…

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Thursday, September 1, 2016

Early Modern Seminar: David Hall (Harvard Divinity School)

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Location: 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall

The Early Modern Area Seminar is please to announce a talk by Professor David D. Hall of Harvard Divinity School: “An Unfinished Reformation and its Critics: The Origins and Development of ‘Puritanism’ in Early Modern England.” 4:30 pm, Thursday, September 1, 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall.

Professor Hall has written extensively on religion and society, as well as the history of the book, in seventeenth-century New England and England. His books include The Faithful Shepherd: A History of the New England Ministry in the Seventeenth Century

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Friday, September 2, 2016

Annual Seamus Heaney Lecture: Declan Kiberd

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Location: Salon B, The William and Mary Ann Smith Ballroom, The Morris Inn

Declan Kiberd

The Institute's annual Seamus Heaney Lecture will be delivered by Declan Kiberd, the Donald and Marilyn Keough Professor of Irish Studies, Professor of English and Irish Language and Literature. His topic:“Modernism in the Streets: Joyce, Pearse and Stephens in 1916."

 

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Wednesday, September 7, 2016

SENS: Heather Hyde Minor

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Location: 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall

The next meeting of the Seminar in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-century Studies (SENS) will take place on Wednesday, September 7, at 5:00 pm in 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall. Heather Hyde Minor, Associate Professor of Art History, will speak on "Piranesi and the Art of History."  A reception will follow.

SENS provides a regular gathering point for the Notre Dame interdisciplinary community of faculty and graduate students engaged with this area of studies. Seminars include lectures, workshops, works-in-progress, and much conversation by Notre Dame faculty and graduate students.…

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Friday, September 9, 2016

American Area Seminar: Koritha Mitchell (Ohio State)

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Location: 312 DeBartolo Hall

Amsem Kmitchell

"A House is not a Home: New Negro Women & Homemaking Anxiety"

This lecture draws from the book-in-progress "From Slave Cabins to the White House: Homemaking Anxiety in African American Culture." Homemaking anxiety is the palpable tension that emerges when African Americans, especially women, continue to invest in traditional domesticity even while seeing the signs that it will not yield for them the respectability and safety it should. In the early 1900s, the community conversation on black success and citizenship centered on "race motherhood," the idea that women could best contribute to racial uplift by supporting men. Black women could not escape the influence of race motherhood, and questioning its expectations made them vulnerable to harsh criticism and possible ostracism. Nevertheless, black women's fiction of the 1920s and 1930s reveals the degree to which race motherhood was interrogated. Indeed, black women authors seem to suggest that the figure of the race mother emerged to rein them in, guiding them to make choices that advanced a male-centered agenda. Zora Neale Hurston's most famous novel Their Eyes Were Watching God

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Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Kelly Kerney, Courtney McDermott, Janet McNally & Lindsay Starck Reading

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Location: Hospitality Room, Reckers

Four alumnae ladies return to campus to read selections from their latest books. 

Kerney Authorphoto2

Kelly Kerney’s first novel, Born Again, was listed among the best debuts of the year by Kirkus Reviews, was a Book Sense Pick, and was recognized by the New York Public Library as one of the best books of 2006.  A Virginia Commission for the Arts fellowship recipient, she lives in Richmond, Virginia.…

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Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Roy Scranton Reading

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Location: Hospitality Room

Rscranton

Roy Scranton is the author of Learning to Die in the Anthropocene: Reflections on the End of a Civilization (City Lights, 2015), and co-editor of Fire and Forget: Short Stories from the Long War (Da Capo, 2013). His journalism, essays, criticism, and fiction have been published in The Nation, Rolling Stone, The New York Times, Contemporary Literature, The Appendix, LIT, Theory & Event

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Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Early Modern Seminar: Sarah Rivett

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Location: South Dining Hall Hospitality Room

The Early Modern Area Seminar is please to announce a talk by Sarah Rivett of Princeton University, "The 'Savage Sounds' of Christian Translations: How Missionaries Confronted the Limits of Universalism in Early America," Tuesday, September 27, at 3:30 pm. in the Hospitality Room of the South Dining Hall.…

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Wednesday, September 28, 2016

MFA 2nd Year Reading Fall 2016

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Location: Fischer Community Center

Zachary Anderson & Chris Muravez blow out the lights and activate the mind via text and visuals.

Zachary Anderson hails from Cheyenne, Wyoming. He received Bachelor of Arts degrees in English and French from the University of Wyoming. He stayed on at UW for a master’s degree in literature, writing a thesis on race and Beat Generation masculinities. Zack is interested in anxiety-ridden poetry that explores gender performance, neurosis, late capitalism, and popular culture.…

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Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Samanta Schweblin

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Location: Oak Room, S Dining Hall

Argentine writer, Semanta Schweblin presents an interview from 4:30 p.m. until 5:30, with a coffee break and then a reading in English and Spanish from 6 to 7 PM.…

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Wednesday, October 5, 2016

SENS: Jeremy Davidheiser

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Location: 119 O'Shaughnessy Hall

The Seminar in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-century Studies (SENS) in the Department of English is pleased to announce its second presentation of the semester: “Charlotte Smith’s ‘Wandering Lover’: Geography and Gender Relations in Desmond and The Young Philosopher,” by Jeremy Davidheiser. Please join us for the talk on Wednesday, October 5, at 5:00 p.m. in 119 O'Shaughnessy, with discussion and conviviality to follow.…

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