Fall 2017

ENGL 20000-01
Introduction to Creative Writing
Daniel Tharp
MW 8:00-9:15

The rules of becoming a writer are very simple: you read and you write. That’s a lie. You read, and write, and taste, and feel, and smell, and listening. That’s a lie. You put pen to paper. That’s a lie. You type on a keyboard. That’s a lie. The truth is that the rules of becoming a writer a very complicated, and if you ask any two writers what those rules might be—they will surely either give you the cliché answer or their answers will be very different from each other. By the end of this semester you will form a definition for Poetry, for Fiction, and for Art—and you will be able to back up your definitions, in the happenstance that you are ever invited to a cocktail party and you’re asked “Soooo… Clarice, what is Poetry?” Ok. The chances of that happening are very slim, but over the course of the semester you will read short stories, you will read poetry, you will read critical theory, you will watch a movie, and you will discuss art and video games. Through all of these experiences, you will encounter things you like, things that disgust you, things you won’t want to keep reading, things that will blow your mind. The goal of this course is for you to have experiences that change the way you define creative writing, and through these definitions learn more about yourself as a writer.

ENGL 20000-02
Introduction to Creative Writing
Moonseok Choi
MW 9:30-10:45

What does it mean to write creatively in the year 2017? How do you get started, and where do you go? In search of answers, we will cross genre and form to wade into the unfamiliar until we find something that is familiar. While there will be a significant amount of reading required, we will place the most emphasis on doing. Writing will occur every week (and hopefully every day!) both in and out of class, and we will move from mode to mode and style to style to knock uncertainty out of the ring and build up the momentum of creativity. By the end of the semester, everyone will have a portfolio of fresh, challenging work.

ENGL 20002-01
Introduction to Poetry Writing
Jeannie Yoon
MW 9:30-10:45

By 'introduction', we mean the instigation of a relationship. To forge a relationship with poetry is to draw closer to language and to connect more deeply with oneself; through this process, you will be changed and open your own capacity to change your life. In this course I will challenge you to read intensively, think deeply, and to write experimentally, expansively, and courageously. We will focus on contemporary poetry and poetics that emerge from the margins of social identity and at interdisciplinary boundaries. At every turn, we will consider questions such as: what is the place of poetry today? What are its powers? What can I do with this?

ENGL 20002-02
Introduction to Poetry Writing
Erik-John Fuhrer
MW 3:30-4:45

This class will emphasize experimentation in poetry. This class will ask you to think about your favorite artist, emulate your favorite poems by them, and then deconstruct and reconstruct them: to build your own words from their ruins. This class will ask you to speak from the voice of the dead, the nonhuman, the marginalized, the ghost world. This class will ask you to play, perform, and enact. This class will not have a single definition of what makes a good poem. This class will instead ask you to define your own aesthetic; to define your own definition of “good.” I don’t love giving classes specific themes because I want each and every student to discover and develop their own theme and passion. I will give you the tools to become the poet that you want to become. We will study very different styles, forms, and possibilities. You will grow to understand something about yourself as a person and as an artist. Take this class if you want to experiment. If you want to dream. If you want to really shake things up. Poets we will read will likely include Patricia Smith, Claudia Rankine and Solmaz Sharif. There will be a lot of excerpts and a lot of surprises. Those who don’t like taking risks should enroll with caution.

ENGL 20003-01
Fiction Writing
Ingabirano Nintunze
MW 11:00-12:15

What do we talk about when we talk about fiction? The short story, the novel, truth, lie, anything imaginary? This class will be an exploration of that: what fiction is and how we use it. In this class, you will write and read and develop a greater understanding of your voice and interests as a writer, through experiencing a range of fictitious forms and learning to navigate the functions of different creative works. Come prepared to figure out what makes you tick, as reader and writer, through new media, new voices, and, of course, new fictions.

ENGL 20003-02
Fiction Writing – Writing Women
Abigail Burns
MW 8:00-9:15

  1. this course, we will explore the fundamental elements of craft in fiction, including but not limited to narrative, point of view, dialogue, and voice. This course is a workshop geared toward generative processes and revision. Throughout the semester we will read contemporary fiction and essays written by women to ground our own creative work, with an eye toward the different ways in which women are represented both in literature and the publishing industry. We will ask how politics, both feminist and otherwise, can or should inform our writing.

ENGL 30851
Poetry Writing
Johannes Goransson
MW 2:00-3:15

In this class, we are going to write poetry, think about poetry and talk about poetry from a number of different perspectives. We're going to read modern, contemporary and not-so-contemporary poetry, as well as works that move across genres (prose poetry, poetic films), media (print, photography, the Internet, the desert of the real), and languages and cultures. We will consider what poetry means in this spectacular age, but we will also explore more pragmatic concerns: where does one find out about poets? Where does one publish poems? Where does one discuss new poetry? In addition to weekly writing exercises, we will engage in three longer projects allowing the students to develop and work on their own particular lines of aesthetic inquiry.

ENGL 30853
Fiction Writing: Walking, Writing, Thinking
Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi
MW 3:30-4:45

In her book Wonderlust: A History of Walking, Rebecca Sulnit writes, "The rhythm of walking generates a kind of rhythm of thinking, and the passage through a landscape echoes or stimulates the passage through a series of thoughts." In this course we will examine notions of journey, pilgrimage, space and subjectivity through the lens of walking. We will look at representations of walking in a variety of genres: essay, graphic novel, fiction, film, prose and poetry and use the practice of walking as a platform to write provocative texts that contemplate the body, architecture, language, philosophy, religion, nature, music and film. Students will engage with course themes and motifs by writing fictions, poems and essays of their own.

ENGL 40850
Advanced Fiction Writing
Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi
MW 5:05-6:20

This course is intended for students who have already taken a Fiction Writing course (or the equivalent) and who are seriously interested in writing fiction, and graduate students who are not in the Creative Writing program. The expectation is that the student is beyond the point of requiring assignments to generate stories. Over the semester, in a workshop setting, student stories will be taken through various stages: due attention will be paid to revision, rewriting, polishing, editing, with a goal that the stories be brought as close as possible to the point of submission as finished work. Practical as well as theoretical issues will be investigated; there will be assigned readings from a variety of fiction authors.

ENGL 40851
Advanced Poetry Writing
Orlando Menes
TR 12:30-1:45

This is a class for students with some background in poetry. We will write & read intensively & widely, exploring what it means to write, read & publish poetry in an era of small-press & Internet publishing, cross-genre & cross-media explorations (poems that invoke film or novels or essays for example). The class will ask for extensive independent work, as students will work on their poems & develop their portfolios. Part of the class time will be spent discussing readings, but much of it will consist of discussing student work. We will develop an artistic, creative & supportive community to help each student grow as readers & writers. The course is ideal for students who are thinking about applying to graduate programs, or for students who simply want to hone their skills in a supportive but dynamic environment.

ENGL 40852
Advanced Fiction Writing II
Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi
MW 5:05-6:20

This course is intended for students who have already taken an Advanced Fiction Writing and who are seriously interested in writing fiction.

ENGL 40854
Advanced Poetry Writing II
Orlando Menes
TR 12:30-1:45

This course is intended for students who have already taken Advanced Poetry Writing and who are seriously interested in writing poetry. The expectation is that the student is beyond the point of requiring assignments to generate stories. Over the semester, in a workshop setting, student stories will be taken through various stages: due attention will be paid to revision, rewriting, polishing, editing, with a goal that the stories be brought as close as possible to the point of submission as finished work. Practical as well as theoretical issues will be investigated; there will be assigned readings from a variety of fiction authors.

ENGL 40855
Advanced Fiction Writing III
Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi
MW 5:05-6:20

This course is intended for students who have already taken an Advanced Fiction Writing and who are seriously interested in writing fiction. The expectation is that the student is beyond the point of requiring assignments to generate stories. Over the semester, in a workshop setting, student stories will be taken through various stages: due attention will be paid to revision, rewriting, polishing, editing, with a goal that the stories be brought as close as possible to the point of submission as finished work. Practical as well as theoretical issues will be investigated; there will be assigned readings from a variety of fiction authors.