Fine Arts Requirement

Fall 2018

ENGL 20000-01
Introduction to Creative Writing
Shinan Xu
MW 8-9:15

This course will introduce you to writing fiction and poetry. We will explore several types of poetry, including but not limited to ekphrasis, epistolary poetry, and erasure. We will experiment with different elements of fiction (characterization, plot and structure, scene and summary, points of view, voice, setting, and dialogue), and learn about how to utilize these elements effectively in narratives. We will read poetry and fiction written by a diverse group of poets and fiction writers, and examine their techniques.

 

ENGL 20000-02
Introduction to Creative Writing
Patricia Hartland
MW 5:05-6:20

In this course together we will forge a community that seeks to question the parameters and potentials of genre. While cultivating a dynamic space of experimentation, creative risk-taking, and honest discussion, this course will aim to adapt to the particular interests and questions of the community; in doing so we will read widely and explore deeply while stretching our creative-writing hands. We will cross-pollinate fiction, poetry, screenwriting, translation, and intermediate works as we dialogue with contemporary authors to hone-in on new understanding. Douglas Kearney, Matthea Harvey, Gwendolyn Brooks, Koffi Kwhaulé, and Layli Long Soldier are just a few of the many voices that will inform our explorations.

 

ENGL 20002-01
Introduction to Poetry Writing
MW 5:05-6:20
A.M. Ringwalt

In Introduction to Poetry Writing, I invite you to develop an intimate, intellectual and social relationship to poetry. Roland Barthes, in his “Death of the Author,” says: “writing is the destruction of every voice, of every distinct point of origin.” As we acquire an understanding of and relationship to the elements of poetry, we will explore the relationship between creation and destruction as they inform and are informed by the art form. We will work to understand and relate to poetry through reading collected works, as well as critical essays, which we will respond to. We will generate new work, engage in collective discussion to further our words’ trajectory (i.e., “workshop”) and, ultimately, complete mini-portfolios as artifacts of our shared learning and engagement with the written word.

 

ENGL 20003-01
Introduction to Fiction Writing
Jake McCabe
MW 8:00-9:15 

Class motto: “Writers make decisions.” In this class, we will read and write literary fiction (whatever that means), with a primary focus on crafting the short story. We will investigate, in both the published stories we will read and in our own work, the “architecture” that an author implements — this will include but is not limited to the relationship between back-story and front-story, different points of view, modes of narrative, and how an author transitions between those modes. We will read as writers, and write with intention ourselves. At the end of the course, we will know why we wrote each paragraph the way we did, why it arrives when it does in the story, and the function it serves for the piece overall. We will know well what to consider when we sit down and write, and how to make the decisions we make on the page.

 

ENGL 20003-02
Introduction to Fiction Writing
Jac Smith
TR 5:05-6:20

In this course, students will learn techniques to aid in the crafting of stories inspired from both life and imagination. We will explore components of short story writing such as: plot, setting, character, description, point of view, dialogue, tone, voice and symbol. Class time will be spent analyzing fiction, talking craft, and giving feedback on each other’s work. Come prepared to read with intention and to write with vigor. Together we will build a writing community where everyone’s vision is taken seriously. Artistic support is a key component to the success of this classroom. What you say matters. What you create matters. With a heavy emphasis on drafting and revision, this course will provide students with the tools to better understand fiction writing.  

 

ENGL 20005
Fiction Writing and the American Short Story
Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi
TR 5:05-6:20

In this introductory course we will focus on 1) reading traditional and innovative 20th-and 21st-century American short stories and 2) on workshopping original student writing. In order to examine the range of narrative strategies available to us as writers, we will read speculative, meta-fictional, hyper-real and surreal fictions, as well as essays on the art of writing. Throughout the course of the semester students will develop as story-tellers, and will learn to read as writers and critique work-in-progress.  

ENGL 30851
Poetry Writing
Joyelle McSweeney
MW 11:00-12:15

In this class, we are going to write poetry, think about poetry and talk about poetry from a number of different perspectives. We're going to read modern, contemporary and not-so-contemporary poetry, as well as works that move across genres (prose poetry, poetic films), media (print, photography, the Internet, the desert of the real), and languages and cultures. We will consider what poetry means in this spectacular age, but we will also explore more pragmatic concerns: where does one find out about poets? Where does one publish poems? Where does one discuss new poetry? In addition to weekly writing exercises, we will engage in three longer projects allowing the students to develop and work on their own particular lines of aesthetic inquiry.

ENGL 40850
Advanced Fiction Writing
Steve Tomasula
TR 5:05-6:20

This is a course in writing fiction for students who have moved beyond the introductory level, and are looking for a way to come into their own as authors. The course focuses on the development of individual student-authors, and so asks them to develop an awareness of contemporary fiction and exemplify, through their own writing, their place in this literary landscape. Just as it is difficult to be a musician without seeing other live musicians play, or a visual artist without looking at the art, ideas, and methods of other working artists, so it is difficult to be an author without reading as authors read, and interacting in the conversation of other, living practitioners. As such, students are asked to identify a literary “conversation” or tradition, or family of works that their own writing extends and/or takes part in; they are asked to think of fiction in terms of the forms they use and how this form will contribute to the aesthetic experience and ideas they are striving to convey.  No one style or type of fiction is advocated over another; in fact, students are encouraged to find their own voice, perspective, and subject matter, and to develop a form suited to their work. However, students will be expected to write fiction that demonstrates awareness of the difference between writing as an art form and formula entertainment. The goal of the course is for each student to emerge with a manuscript at the level of a beginning author writing as a literary artist.

 

ENGL 40851
Advanced Poetry Writing
Johannes Goransson
MW 9:30-10:45

This is a class for students with some background in poetry. We will write & read intensively & widely, exploring what it means to write, read & publish poetry in an era of small-press & Internet publishing, cross-genre & cross-media explorations (poems that invoke film or novels or essays for example). The class will ask for extensive independent work, as students will work on their poems & develop their portfolios. Part of the class time will be spent discussing readings, but much of it will consist of discussing student work. We will develop an artistic, creative & supportive community to help each student grow as readers & writers. The course is ideal for students who are thinking about applying to graduate programs, or for students who simply want to hone their skills in a supportive but dynamic environment.

 

ENGL 40852
Advanced Fiction Writing II
Steve Tomasula
MW 5:05-6:20

This course is intended for students who have already taken an Advanced Fiction Writing and who are seriously interested in writing fiction.

 

ENGL 40854
Advanced Poetry Writing II
Johannes Goransson
TR 12:30-1:45

This course is intended for students who have already taken Advanced Poetry Writing and who are seriously interested in writing poetry. The expectation is that the student is beyond the point of requiring assignments to generate stories. Over the semester, in a workshop setting, student stories will be taken through various stages: due attention will be paid to revision, rewriting, polishing, editing, with a goal that the stories be brought as close as possible to the point of submission as finished work. Practical as well as theoretical issues will be investigated; there will be assigned readings from a variety of fiction authors.

 

ENGL 40855
Advanced Fiction Writing III
Steve Tomasula
MW 5:05-6:20

This course is intended for students who have already taken an Advanced Fiction Writing and who are seriously interested in writing fiction. The expectation is that the student is beyond the point of requiring assignments to generate stories. Over the semester, in a workshop setting, student stories will be taken through various stages: due attention will be paid to revision, rewriting, polishing, editing, with a goal that the stories be brought as close as possible to the point of submission as finished work. Practical as well as theoretical issues will be investigated; there will be assigned readings from a variety of fiction authors.